Connecting old tv

  Riccardo123 02:35 23 Sep 07
Locked

I have an ancient TV that only has a coax socket in the back of it, absolutely nothing else. I've established from some research that if I want to connect a digital box I need an RF modulator, either built into the box or bought seperately.

However, completely seperate from the digital box issue, I was looking at buying a DVD Recorder and am slightly confused about whether it's even possible to make it work on my current TV. Specifically I was looking at the Philips DVDR3480. In examining the manual online to try and work out if it would work for me, I see that it has antenna-in and RF-out sockets (which I'm familiar with). However, the manual then seems to suggest that in order to view disc playback I need to connect either SCART, S-Video or CVBS as well as the coax (which obviously is impossible with my TV).

So have I interpreted that correctly, and is that the state of affairs with any DVD recorder/player I would look at? Is there no way to get a DVD recorder to work on my TV so that I could both record/watch broadcast TV and watch commercial DVDs?

Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

  ICF 08:47 23 Sep 07

Loads to choose from here click here=

  ICF 08:52 23 Sep 07
  ICF 09:06 23 Sep 07

Just had a look at the Philips DVDR3480 and it's only an analogue recorder.Wouldn't you be better getting a unit with a freeview tuner.

  David4637 14:08 23 Sep 07

You will probably need a wide band aerial to pick up Freeview and also analogue, unless your signal is very good. Worth while doing now as some of the digital channels are worth watching. Also make sure your the DVD recorder has a twin tuners, one for analogue for now, and one for freeview now or for the future. David

  Stuartli 15:45 23 Sep 07

If you wish to connect a Freeview set top box to your present TV, then a straightforward coaxial cable connection will be sufficient (you may also need a wideband aerial as suggested to pick up all, rather than just the majority, of Freeview signals); the initial TV aerial input would go into the STB and an RF extension lead from the box to the TV's aerial input).

A set top box picks up the digital Freeview TV and radio channels and then converts them back to analogue so that they can be viewed on an analogue television - this will still prove the case after the full digital transmissions switchover.

However, a twin tuner Freewview DVD recorder such as the Humax PVR 9200T has two digital tuners plus an RF modulator for analogue signals; the main aim is to allow you to record one programme and watch another, or even record two programme choices and watch a third programme via a Freeview TV set.

See:

click here

for details of what is a superb machine.

However, the really get the best out of a model such as the Humax you need the standard of TV set to go with it...:-)

  Riccardo123 03:31 30 Sep 07

"If you wish to connect a Freeview set top box to your present TV, then a straightforward coaxial cable connection will be sufficient (you may also need a wideband aerial as suggested to pick up all, rather than just the majority, of Freeview signals); the initial TV aerial input would go into the STB and an RF extension lead from the box to the TV's aerial input)"

That's not what is suggested by a lot of things I've read. Most set-top boxes don't modulate the RF signal - the RF connections are just a loop-through, while the digital signal is sent through the scart connection. Hence the need for an RF modulator.

Anyway, I don't think anyone's really answered my original main question - would a standard DVD Recorder like the one I mentioned even operate correctly without any connection other than the RF cable? The manual I read seemed to suggest that I might be able to view/record TV shows, but that viewing bought DVDs wouldn't work without one of the additional scart, s-video etc. connections.

  Stuartli 10:30 30 Sep 07

If you buy a Freeview set top box with a built-in UHF modulator, you don't need a Scart socket.

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