WYSIWYG is heading to Linux

  Taran 10:14 26 Jan 04
Locked

OK, so Linux is the long-term "almost, but never quite got there also ran" by comparison to Windows but its popularity is growing all the time, mainly for personal desktop use.

It is rightly popular in the network and web server environments but, so far, has made little or no impact as a desktop system for large scale use although some organisations are looking into it, trialling it and in one or two cases, moving over to it.

The latest version of WINE, a Windows emulator, allows you to run all kinds of Windows programs on Linux. I recently saw a Mandrake system running DreamweaverMX under WINE and I've also seen Microsoft Office [not including Access] running on Linux. This raises some obvious questions about licensing issues, not to mention why anyone would even want to try it, but, moving swiftly on...

Moves are being made to bring a dedicated WYSIWYG web editor called Nvu to Linux click here

It is backed and mainly sponsored by Lindows, those nice people who ae doing a pretty impressive job of bringing an easy to use domestic desktop operating system Linux distribution to market.

There are no downloads available for it yet, but screenshots look impressive and it seems to indicate that there is a general shift for most Linux distributions away from the command line, text prompt, full-on geek systems to a more well rounded, graphical and easy to use environment.

So far, it remains to be seen whether this is a tool for beginners to easily generate their own websites or whether it will also include the more advanced features of Dreamweaver, FrontPage and similar products. If both beginners and advanced users are catered for, I can see this opening up all kinds of possibilities.

Linux natively runs the Apache web server, MySQL and PHP so if you could combine that testing server environment with a good WYSIWYG editor, development time on Linux would be greatly improved. At the moment, Linux web developers use a combination of simple text editors and, at the other end of the scale, Quanta, which is sort of like Macromedia HomeSite.

I know Windows is very rightly the majority OS in the world and very probably always will be, but it's always nice to see some thought going into providing applications that directly meet the working needs and expectations of all [hopefully] of its users.

T

  Sir Radfordin 10:36 26 Jan 04

...but so is Welsh (click here)...I wonder which would be more useful??

  Taran 14:50 26 Jan 04

From a purely personal perspective, I think a WYSIWYG editor for Linux would be of far more use than Welsh WIndows, at least to me...

;o)

  powerless 20:24 26 Jan 04

Taran...did you know FE is Welsh?

He'll eat you for that ;-))

"There are no downloads available for it yet, but screenshots look impressive and it seems to indicate that there is a general shift for most Linux distributions away from the command line, text prompt, full-on geek systems to a more well rounded, graphical and easy to use environment.

If they could do that for Linux, it would help, command line bit.

  srthrdtjytjjd 20:41 26 Jan 04

I'm in the process of obtaining a cheapish computer for trying Linux with. Does anyone know of a web address for a builder?

Regards,

Pete

  PurplePenny 23:19 26 Jan 04

Thanks Taran - must point my bro. in that direction (unless he is already reading this thread...).

Penny

  duckers 00:48 27 Jan 04

Just put it on your current PC dual boot? as long as you get a good quality distribution like red hat, SuSE, mandrake, you should have no trouble, its not as easy as installing windows but the latest versions aer quite good.
Bare in mind though Linux is an experimental world,, there are always lots of changes going on and as most stuff is free it can be pretty buggy sometimes.
Saying that ive used it for a good few years now and have had no major (touch wood!!) episodes,, and when something has gone wrong its usually been salvagable through the rescue package.
installing drivers and new packages is the worst thing you have to do, but now with red hat RPM's and other similar installation methods its much safer/simpler.
If you want a cheap PC you can look at places like microlandtechnology, microdirect, etc and pick up a decent system under £300, if thats too much scour teh local free ads,, but done expect much price difference,,

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