Why do PCA not review Dell?

  Stuart Thompson 09:12 21 Apr 05
Locked

I've bought the mag for its rankings of home-use desktops (I'm not a PC buff), but don't understand why the surveys in this - and other mags - don't seem to include Dells. According to PCA's latest edition, you cannot get Pentium 4s or flat screens in the super-budget range, yet the mag contain adverts for just that from Dell. Am I missing something here? Are they no good for home use? Perhaps I should be asking PCA this? My usage is really only internet & perhaps a bit of music downloads.

  TomJerry 09:33 21 Apr 05

Dell is so big and so successful now, it does not really care about a review in mags, so it does not normally bother to give mags freebee

mags do not buy any PC

Dell PCs are great, but they put more effort in company market instead of home market now

  Stuartli 10:07 21 Apr 05

Magazine reviewers usually review machines which a manufacturer submits for that purpose on request, either direct or through its public relations firm.

They will be returned after being reviewed and are certainly not freebies; only exceptions may be low cost items, software etc which will not be worth the cost of collecting after review.

If a manufacturer doesn't wish its systems or products to be reviewed (a small independent systems manufacturer, for instance, may not be able to afford to constantly supply review items), then it turns down publicity (good or bad) by default.

The only reviews undertaken where the publication/reviewers actually go out and buy the products involved - from say an £20 iron to a £20,000 or more car - is a well known consumer magazine. You'll have to guess which one I'm referring to in this case.

  Colinp 10:42 21 Apr 05

Which magazine would that be then?

  wiz-king 12:55 21 Apr 05

because the mag's staff cant configure Dell's website to get it to produce a machine! Too many options.

  oresome 13:50 21 Apr 05

I believe responsible magazines only publish reviews where they have some assurance that the review model is repeatable in volumes to meet the possible demand. Shouldn't be a problem with Dell of course, but could be with small assemblers who buy components in small quantities and may have to change the spec rather quickly.

  Stuartli 14:03 21 Apr 05

So they would have no requirement for reviews unless they are prepared to substantially expand - not necessarily the step they wish to make.

  New Neophyte 14:40 21 Apr 05

DELL continue to buy advertising space-logically then it doesn't want or need editorial coverage, which perhaps smaller manufacturers rely on to a greater degree? If this is the case, does it imply that editorial coverage is weighted in favour of smaller, hungrier companies?

Hmmm

NN

  961 16:44 21 Apr 05

I have to say that you will find reviews of Dell machines if you buy magazines aimed at the business IT industry

Although Dell advertises in the consumer IT press it does most of its business supplying workstations by the lorry load.

If I were to buy a Dell I would get a well specified machine built from quality no nonsense parts that was designed to work without trouble

For Dell, I guess the order from the home user is the icing on the cake, at a better price than it gets from a company that buys 100 machines

The home buyer must bear in mind that the business user is probably prepared to pay more for on site service, but then he can write this off against expenses and reclaim the vat into the bargain

At the end of the day, by and large, they are good machines. But they are not designed primarily for the home user

  recap 17:36 21 Apr 05

At work we purchase our systems from Dell.

961 wrote:
"The home buyer must bear in mind that the business user is probably prepared to pay more for on site service, but then he can write this off against expenses and reclaim the vat into the bargain"

The on site service is in my opinion second to none. And I do not believe we pay an extra premium for the privilege. We do how ever claim the VAT back on our purchases, which I suppose is an extra above that of the home purchaser.

At point to note about Dell and some other main suppliers, a floppy drive is now classed as an extra, and does not come as a standard feature. As one of my students has just recently found out.

  Stuartli 18:08 21 Apr 05

>>If this is the case, does it imply that editorial coverage is weighted in favour of smaller, hungrier companies? Hmmm>>

No.

Are you trying to kid me that Mesh, Evesham and similar companies are smaller and hungrier than others?

The case for Dell is that it is the world number one and renowned for many years for producing high quality systems; people are fully prepared to pay more for the privilege of owning one.

It therefore doesn't really need to rely on media reviews to sell them - it already has a solid worldwide base from which to work.

However, other companies obviously feel that submitting systems for review is worthwhile, as well as a lot cheaper than increasing advertising to bring them to people's attention.

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