What is new?

  square eyes 22:18 27 Jan 10
Locked

Hi.

I was a bit late in finding out the truth, but i ordered from "bitesizedeals" and am now waiting for a refund having heard the bad stories.

I suppose when money is an issue or its paramount to get the best bargain, then you are at risk from dodgy sites. I want to know what is new.

I was looking for a sony camcorder and again, went for the best deal; this time wolu.co.uk. They have a uk address and they claim to dispatch from this address, so i felt i was safe in ordering.

I feel somewhat confused when i see items being sold on the internet by private sellers as "new", and quite often it is said that the box has been opened. In my view, then it cannot be called new, as new is not used...surely.

So im a little nervous waiting for my £505 camcorder (which went up to £550 the following day). Do you agree with me on this? If you buy direct from an online seller and there is no indication that it is used, then one has to assume it is new. If it is sold as new, then i want to see an original sony's seal on the box. If it doesnt have one or its clear that the box has been opened, then i will want to return it as i have no idea what has happened to the camera since leaving Sony. I also dont think a 1 year warranty is compensation for this .

If the seal has been invalidated, will i (by law) have good reason to return it?

Thanks

  Forum Editor 23:47 27 Jan 10

from an online trader you may return the item for a full refund within 7 days of the date of receipt without having to give a reason.

If you wish to do this you must notify the seller of your intention by email (don't do it by phone), and ask for an acknowledgement of your notification, together with instructions for return.

  square eyes 20:53 28 Jan 10

thanks for the reply and advice

  interzone55 11:49 29 Jan 10

If a customer returns something just because they didn't like it, what is the retailer supposed to do with that product?

If the only thing wrong with the product is a damaged seal it will just go back on the shelf, as it's still new.

Sometimes the customer will lie and say it's unused when really they've played with it a couple of times, but they've put it back in the box with all the manuals intact, that will also go back on the shelf, as the retailer won't know the customer is lying.

  square eyes 21:12 29 Jan 10

Im not totally sure why that is relative to my post. I wouldnt expect to return an item when id used it on the basis that i didnt like it. Many high street stores wont allow that, but only allow a refund for a non-faulty item if the seal is still intact and unopened. Im happy with that system.

  interzone55 21:26 29 Jan 10

"I wouldnt expect to return an item when id used it on the basis that i didnt like it. Many high street stores wont allow that, but only allow a refund for a non-faulty item if the seal is still intact and unopened"

I used to work for Index (Argos's failed competitor) and we had a 16 day money back guarantee - you could return anything in that time (unused) for a full refund.

We used to get around 10% of all sales returned, and the period after Christmas was madness. The amount of "unused" items that were actually used was unbelievable. One customer tried to return a deep fat fryer that they swore was new, but I could feel the oil sloshing around inside. We also had a pushchair returned, with a seemingly perfectly sealed box but I could smell baby poo on it, and indeed when I opened the box it was rather soiled.
Our customers were the kind of people who would be barred from Tesco for wearing their pyjamas...

  square eyes 22:10 29 Jan 10

"Our customers were the kind of people who would be barred from Tesco for wearing their pyjamas..."

Hehe :) I knoe the value of a seal doesnt apply to all things, but when it comes to delicate electrical items, i belive there is a legal seal that many retailers will use as a get out if the item is "notliked", i dont blame them for that as most people i think, want their product in 1st class condition.

If id have been in your shoes i would have found that difficult to deal with. Pushchairs dont tend to come boxed with a quality approved seal, so i suppose im only talking about electrical items such as cameras.

  Woolwell 22:16 29 Jan 10

Cameras, especially camcorders, are "borrowed" by people for events and then the customer tries to get a refund a few days after.

  square eyes 22:35 29 Jan 10

"Cameras, especially camcorders, are "borrowed" by people for events and then the customer tries to get a refund a few days after"

Exactly! If its opened, chances are its done a few rounds and had a few knocks too.

  Forum Editor 23:26 29 Jan 10

that the law provides a seven-day period within which goods purchased on-line may be returned without any explanation.

The reason for the legislation is the fact that on-line purchasers do not have a chance to examine goods prior to purchase - so the law allows a contract escape route. The seven day rule does not apply to software if the pack seal is broken, or to goods that have been made to a customer's specification. It does however apply to computers that have been configured from a list of options on the supplier's website.

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