Is The TP-Link TL-WR1043ND Idea For MultiUsers?

  Tycer 12 Jun 12
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Our current Wireless router needs replacing. I have been hunting around reviews and websites, to find the best router for my household. Our current household conditions are; Download Speed; 7.04mbps Upload Speed; 0.85mbps

We are a household of 3 pc's, normal internet requirements are; 1person on-line gaming, 1 person casual internet browsing, worst case scenario 1 person on-line gaming, 2 persons casual internet browsing.

I have read the reviews on: TP-Link TL-WR1043ND it is obviously a good product for the price, I am unsure however that it will meet my needs. Do you have any recommendations on this product or other products that are available.

Looking Forward To Any Advice! Thanks In Advanced!

  yonex24562 12 Jun 12

I have this router myself, my broadband provider is fibre optic cable so the download and upload speeds are different but I can say that we have had 3 different pc's online at the same time doing different things and no apparent problems. if transferring data from one to another the home network speed is excellent. It's easy to set up and I would recommend this router to anyone. Hope this helps.

  natdoor 13 Jun 12

As implied by the post from yonex24562, this router is for cable internet access. It seems that you may have DSL judging by the speeds quoted, in which case it is the wrong type of router.

  TP-LINK UK 20 Jun 12

Hi,

Just want to mention that TL-WR1043ND is not a cable router, as long as you have modem at your home then you can attach the router to the modem and can have wireless internet connection.

And this router will be ideal for the case which Tycer as long as he has modem at his home.

Regards,

TP-LINK UK Limited

  retep888™ 22 Jun 12

Just want to mention that TL-WR1043ND is not a cable router

But according to TP-LINK click here as well as PCA review click here it is a cable router.

TP-LINK UK Limited????

click here for OP's another thread about an ADSL modem router this time however.

  TP-LINK UK 22 Jun 12

Hi,

You’ll already have a broadband modem supplied by your ISP, and the router simply connects to this using an Ethernet cable connection that's why its called cable router but that doesn't means that you can't use the router other than that,you can see the specification http://uk.tp-link.com/products/details/?categoryid=238&model=TL-WR1043ND#spec, and in the wan type you can see the protocols supported,if your ISP uses that protocols this router is compatible as long as you have modem already present.

Also yes we have our local office in UK and increasing our presence and trying to interact with customers through forums too. Please be free to ask if you have any further queries.

Regards, TP-LINK UK Limited

  Woolwell 22 Jun 12

TP_LINK UK jumps to the conclusion that they already have a modem. They may not as they may have been supplied with a modem/router.

  retep888™ 24 Jun 12

that's why its called cable router but that doesn't means that you can't use the router other than that

Yes, you can connect a cable router to an Adsl router thru' the Lan port & get the Wan IP address but the performance will be limited by the old Adsl router & I think the general users won't go this way, why don't they simply replace it with a more advanced modem/router?

You’ll already have a broadband modem supplied by your ISP, and the router simply connects to this using an Ethernet cable connection

In UK if you were supplied with a modem only on an Adsl (telephone) broadband then it'd be a USB modem, how do you connect a cable router such as the TL-WR1043ND to a USB modem?

  natdoor 25 Jun 12

It would seem that there is no standard use of terminology here. Surely that is something which is absolutely necessary.

It is suggested that because you can connect the router to a modem by an ethernet cable it is a cable router. My understanding is that cable is almost universally used in this context to mean fibre optic, to distinguish the device from one using any other type of wired connection. In this case, it implies that it is contains a modem.

Also, there is no consistency in the use of the term router. Sometimes it is used for a device sharing multiple outlets from a single source and sometimes it contains a modem. Why not use router and modem/router to differentiate between the two.

It should not be neceesary to study the full specification to determine the the top level characteristics of a device.

  spuds 25 Jun 12

Perhaps well out of order, but when I have discussed a cable modem/router or a 'BT' modem/router with someone like an assistant from PC World/Currys, they nearly always seem to suggest that we are talking about different devices, hence usually the price difference between a same manufacturer's product, but with a 'Cable' or 'BT' sticker attached?.

  TP-LINK UK 26 Jun 12

Hi retep888

We have combine modem/router please follow this link to view different types http://uk.tp-link.com/products/?categoryid=203.

Regards, TP-LINK UK Limited

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