three red lights of death

  anotony 13:32 10 Mar 07
Locked

with ever increasing sophisticated nxt gen consoles on the market and higher purchase costs, are the consumer left with just a turkey? the answer must be yes. The fact that 360 increasing hardware faults (three red lights of death) and out of warranty the consumer is left with a £83.00 repairs bill, ps3 reportedly having problems of their own so what about the consumer when they buy something they expect it to be reliable!

  The Brigadier 15:09 10 Mar 07

Sadly it seems more "hi-tech" pc;s & consoles only have a short life span and sadly it seems pc's are built the same way.

Bit i have a Dell P120 that is used only for printing out bills with a DOS programe and i use once a month. It is still going after 9 years!

  Forum Editor 18:16 10 Mar 07

at least when a technology is young. Some people will remember how unreliable Television equipment was when the market was expanding. Computers, and computer software is just the same. As technologies mature, so reliability levels rise. It's extremely rare for a TV to go on the blink nowadays.

  silverous 23:05 10 Mar 07

The consumer has a right to expect that something is reliable and they are protected by the Sale of Goods Act. If your Xbox or PS3 or anything else for that matter fails within a period of time that is not 'reasonable' (doesn't have to be the 1 year usually offered by manufacturers) then you can ask them to repair it or I believe you would be able to take small claims court action against them.

  Belatucadrus 11:18 11 Mar 07

I have fond memories as a kid of watching Mr Yapp the TV repair man incessantly swapping out toasted valves in our TV, also the occasional need to grope around the back searching for the vertical hold knob to stop the picture scrolling over and over. Combine that with the inestimable pleasure of watching the picture shrink before slowly expiring as you turned it off, makes you realise just how soulless these modern HD high tech boxes are.

  Starfox 14:58 11 Mar 07

*Some people will remember how unreliable Television equipment was when the market was expanding.*

I remamber when we got our first Television in 1957, the year we had electricity installed, and my dad got us a Ferguson t.v on rental.

It had only been on a couple of hours when it caught fire, no kidding. Rang the shop and they brought out another one. That lasted less than an hour, in the end I think we went through five Ferguson t.v's before my dad said *Enough* and we got an Ultra. It never caught fire but we got very friendly with all the t.v repair men.

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