Possible faulty gfx card, where do I stand?

  Ironman556 10:28 22 Mar 03
Locked

I bought a 64Mb GF4 Ti4200 from Anyweb PC's in mid Jan, and have always had problems with it blacking out/restarting PC, so have never really been able to use it (you may have seen my posts in the help room). I've now done everything I can think of and which has been suggested to me (apart from BIOS upgrade because I don't have a clue how to go about that), and have gone back to Anyweb, and they said that they would take the whole system in and have a look, and replace the card if it's faulty.

Assuming it's a faulty card, should I be able to get a refund for it or only be able to swap it? The price of the cards has now dropped from ~£120 (which I paid) to around £90 - 100 for a 128Mb, so would I be able to get an upgrade to a card I could get for the same price today or have I just got to accept it?

If it's just incompatible with my system (fairly old, but was told that I should be ok, and meets the min spec on the box), what can I do? I've read in here that you can only get a refund if you can prove that you were told there'd be no probs, otherwise it's sell the product on and try again?

As I have work to do at the moment, I am unable to get the system in for another few weeks, will they be able to argue that I've left it too long for a refund while it's still under guarentee?

Thanks

  Forum Editor 12:23 22 Mar 03

If your retailer told you the card would work with your hardware/software combination it would have constituted a condition of the contract - i.e. you relied on the information when making the purchase. In such a case you would be entitled to a full refund if the card didn't work.

In your case you say you were 'told it should be OK' (which is rather vague), and you say that your machine meets the minimum requirements printed on the box. It's the last part that's important - your computer complies with the maker's minimum requirements - and on the face of it you aren't entitled to a refund. You won't need one if the retailer can get things working. Anyweb seem to be doing the right thing, and if they replace the card with a working one you haven't any grounds to complain.

You mustn't expect to profit from the interim change in card price - that's not how it works. You were happy to accept the price when you paid it, and you must live with that.

  Ironman556 17:55 22 Mar 03

Thanks.

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