NTL Imposes ISP Usage Restrictions

  New Zealander 11:10 08 Feb 03
Locked

Have a read here click here

  Forum Editor 11:26 08 Feb 03

1 Gb of file transfer a day per user isn't exactly tiny, and the vast majority will come nowhere near this limit. The people who have brought about the need for such restrictions are the bandwidth hogs who spend all day downloading software and MP3 tracks from P2P services.

  powerless 11:38 08 Feb 03

I've come close 600 or so Mb's...

Only the once mind you.

Daily i'd say i receieve about 50MB of Data.

  TOPCAT® 12:12 08 Feb 03
  siouxah1 12:41 08 Feb 03

FE,

I'm not often given to commenting on such occurrences. It may well be caused by "bandwidth hogs who spend all day downloading software and MP3 tracks from P2P services."

Then I suggest that the Company punishes these people and not impose a collective punishment. Something that I deplore.

I might add that I would not be even close to that download amount.

I detect a case of "now that we have a collective consumer base let us raise the prices". This may not effect the majority of users at the moment, but using the cucumber slice scenario who knows in the future.

I am surprised that you would support the use of collective punishment.

Regards Brian.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 12:53 08 Feb 03

Hmmmmmmm.....The Kazaa brigade must be wailing and gnashing at their misfortune.

G

  spuds 14:01 08 Feb 03

Once again we are in the position that mass advertising and special offers to entice extra revenue for the ISP companies hasn't paid off.They set the terms and conditions, then commence in changing the consumers usage, when the account figues do not balance.

  obbit 22:45 08 Feb 03

if NTL are finding they need to limit usage with 500,000 customers they might impose a limit of say 500meg in future. it was sold to me as "always on". it may pan out to be time limited soon. e.g 3 hours a day

  special sophie 23:15 08 Feb 03

NTL's proposed changes only highlights a lack of forsight, unwillness to invest in improving there service and a complete disregard for the end consumer. I for one will not be renewing my contract with this company.

  Forum Editor 23:39 08 Feb 03

first saw the light of day industry experts have been saying that the future issue would be bandwidth, and their predictions are coming true. It's easy to trot out the "many being punished for the sins of the few" argument, but that isn't the point is it? Those who rely on that argument might do well to consider the facts before posting.

Let's assume for the sake of argument that some 85% of broadband users come nowhere near a 1Gb a day transfer figure - the new limit won't affect them in the slightest will it? The people who will be 'punished' are the very people who are causing the problem in the first place, so I don't really see where the difficulty lies.

As for "now that we have a collective consumer base let us raise the prices" I'm not sure where that impression came from - the article linked to in New Zealander's post makes no mention of a price increase.

NTL - like any other commercial enterprise - is in business to make a profit, not to provide a means for a minority to selfishly hog available bandwidth at the expense of 'normal' users. The people who routinely notch up huge downstream transfer figures are usually doing so because they are downloading illegal MP3 tracks and software - often so they can sell CDs down the pub, or at car boot sales. NTL (and other ISPs) will increasingly be looking at ways to stop this activity, and if one of them is to limit download totals then so be it. The vast majority of their customers will not be affected.

  zootschosen 00:13 09 Feb 03

I don't see why my downloading of say the latest version of Red Hat Linux should be restricted. It does seem as Brian said to be partly collective punishment. But as the FE suggests its an acknowledgment that the current way of things may not be sustainable in NTLs eyes. However it is rather unfair on those who paid expecting to be able to use their connection potential more.

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