How much would you pay > cmos battery replacement?

  theDarkness 01:53 25 Nov 10
Locked

How much should I roughly be expected to pay for a cmos battery and installation from a general non high street pc repair store for a cmos battery replacement, including the cost of the battery? The laptop is out of warranty, so I dont really want to be spending £30+ just for Packard to find and install one. The reason I need someone else to do it is because this particular packard system has the most awkward setup, and therefore access to the battery is next to impossible.

as you can see from my (slightly blurry) photo-
click here

there are only 3 panels on the back of the machine that you can remove- 1 hard drive, 2 ram, and 3 wifi card (I think!).. the cmos battery (the circle!) is to the right of one of the panels, under the casing. I have tried removing the entire casing, all screws and connections, and even from the front, trying to get to it by removing the keyboard, but its proved impossible to me, so Id rather get someone else to do it. No doubt the difficulty is on purpose so that you would always send it to packard for repair, and for a high price, but this laptop is from 2006 and out of warranty.. so for how much should I have to pay in total from a general repair shop? I know the cmos batteries themselves (if the type I need is easy to find that is) are usually next to nothing in price, but what would you pay for installation?

thanks for any help-now I must sleep!

  birdface 04:47 25 Nov 10

I would say probably they would charge you about £5 for the Battery and £15 for fitting it I cannot see it being any more than that if using the High Street store.
Best bet would be to phone them give them the model and make of the Laptop and see how much they would charge.
I would imagine it could be as little as £15 but probably somewhere between the 2 prices.

  uk-wizard 08:29 25 Nov 10

Think of it as a washing machine - minimum of 1 hour labour charge ~ £25.

  carver 08:48 25 Nov 10

And give the hard drive a spin.

  spuds 10:57 25 Nov 10

A difficult question, but I would perhaps suggest that you contact a local independent computer shop.

I get the batteries from Poundland on a big card containing many other types of similar batteries. Another source of 2202/5(?) batteries about 25pence each in packs of four, but expect to pay a lot more from other outlets.

One of our local major commercial IT computer companies charge a minimum of £60 per hour or part thereof. The very local guy (depending on work load) would charge about £20/25 per hour.

  oresome 19:59 25 Nov 10

Our local shoe repair and key cutting shop wanted to charge me £15 for a watch battery that was a two minute job.

If the laptop has to be stripped down, I would expect £40-£50 minimum plus battery cost and VAT.

Who repairs washing machines for £25 per hour?

  theDarkness 20:58 25 Nov 10

oresome-haha, true-but even if I knew how to open it correctly, remove and insert battery, then close up again-and I had the necessary tools), I bet thats not even a 20 min job. Thanks for the replies-Im going to see if anyone I know can do the job first as a last resort, otherwise Ill have to try the local repair store.

Spuds-I will try poundland tomorrow to see if the one here sells the same lithium battery set, cheers for that. I am wondering however if a repair store would be very happy with me actually having the battery to insert, since that theoretically means less money for them in total to charge, haha :)

  bjh 10:03 26 Nov 10

I use Poundland batteries in all sorts of bits, so I'm not disparaging them, per se; however, if it is extremely difficult to access the area, it's not something you want to do again in a hurry, nor somewhere you want a battery to leak. I'd be minded to buy a "posh" branded battery for this occasion.... and I speak as one who penny-pinches when I can.

Most battery areas are accessible without too much fuss. Take your time, and look at the casing very carefully, and you might find there's an easier way of accessing it...

  bjh 10:05 26 Nov 10

Oh, the batteries are usually 2025, I think. What is the actual model number? I have a PB here - just a chance it's similar to open...

  Wilham 17:59 26 Nov 10

It may be useful to know that lithium coin battery numbers are generally guided to size by putting a decimal point in the second pair of digits. Examples I have in hand...

CR 2032 is approx. 20mm diameter and 3.2mm thick.
CR 1620 " " . 16mm " " 2.0mm " .

They are all nominally 3v, and on occasion I have padded a thinner coin with a metal washer as makeshift.

I haven't seen conformation of this. though is apparent in this link...

click here

  theDarkness 16:52 28 Nov 10

bjh - theres a click here in my first post, a rough idea of the layout, battery is just under the casing.
wilham - thanks, useful to know :) I still havent gotten around to looking for batteries, so will have to wander this week/from mon for a set.

The laptop is an Argo C model of a Packard Bell "Easynote". It was very slow, impossible to use. I did however eventually manage to run an antivirus scan, which found 3 or more objects which it recommended to get rid of. I did so, then I wanted to try a clean reinstall of xp, as the owner of the laptop wanted. The installation bar was slow, failed a couple of times, but eventually installed windows.

If its not a simple battery problem (eg if its ram etc as Strawballs has suggested in my initial post) then itll definately be an independant store to do the fixing if thats the best way to go about it. thanks.

My original post is click here
I thought id be better to ask about the batteries in here, so if anyone would like to add to the topic, please reply there, to avoid confusion (my fault-sorry)! thanks

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