copyright and are they right!

  jospar 20:41 15 Oct 03
Locked

In a moment of sadness this afternoon, I actually watched a bit of telly, and this part even gets sadder!

Watching QVC lol, they were demonstrating a CD/tape radio player, showed the tape deck, played part of a CD, and when talking about the radio said that they couldn't play this due to copyright laws, fair enough I thought.

Here comes the interesting bit, the female presenter asked, if you could record a CD to the tape, the chaps reply was ' yes you could, as long as it was for personal use, i.e to play in your car, and not for public performance or for monetary gain'

News to me, I'd always thought that any copying for any reason was a very big NO NO?

So do they know something we don't or are they just plain and simply wrong?

  Djohn 20:54 15 Oct 03

No I don't think they are wrong. As far as I understand the copyright law, [And that's not much] it's OK to make a copy for your own personal and private use. j.

  Forum Editor 20:56 15 Oct 03

they are plain and simply wrong - if they were transmitting from the UK that is.

Most, if not all music copyright holders will turn a blind eye if you copy a CD to play in the car, but that isn't the same as granting a copyright licence (which they don't).

The test I always apply is: If I didn't have the technology available to make a copy would I go out and buy another copy of the CD for the car (or whatever). If the answer is 'no' then I feel happier about making my copy - because I'm not depriving the copyright holder of any income.

That's the unofficial position - the official position is that under the terms of the copyright licence (which is really what you pay for when you buy a CD)you are not permitted to make any copies at all.

  powerless 00:00 16 Oct 03

That's the unofficial position - the official position is that under the terms of the copyright licence (which is really what you pay for when you buy a CD)you are not permitted to make any copies at all.

Unless otherwise stated?

  Forum Editor 00:55 16 Oct 03

I'm not aware of having ever seen a music CD copyright licence that permitted the making of any copies. I'm prepared to accept that one may exist, but I certainly don't know of it, so for the meantime my statement remains - you are not permitted to make any copies at all.

  tbh72 01:37 16 Oct 03

Don't quote me on this, but I think the laws of copyright might change to allow for a personal copy to be made. The turn a blind eye assumption will become a thing of the past with the ongoing development of CD copy protection.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 07:37 16 Oct 03

In the States you are allowed to make a single copy of a programme or a music Cd as a backup. This was passed underr the FOIA laws. However if you try to flog this copy on and Plod finds out, you are nailed to the mast. In the UK there has never been a 'single. personal copy' law. It is a tacit agreement that copying music, onto tape/MP3, THAT HAS ALREADY BEEN PURCHASED BY THE PERSON (the important bit) is grudgingly let by.

I have bought full copies of Photoshop 7, Office XP, etc and have a copy of each in case they are damaged, robbed etc. The copies are only for safekeeping in case of disaster as I know, from bitter experience, that the bunch of highway robbers referred to as 'Insurance Companies', will tell me to naff off when I try to claim £600 for my Photoshop CD that was eaten by the cat. The main point is that the copies will never be sold or 'put' on anyone else's computer.

G

G

  tenaka 17:37 16 Oct 03

I think it's a case of the government (or whomever worries about this sort of thing) knows a lot of people make backups and tolerates it whilst it is small scale and does little damage. Only if it actually causes damage will they turn around and say "well actually it is against our law so we are going to prosecute".

I remember my dad renting dodgy videos of new films years ago and how he would say we were ok, the police wouldn't worry about one person watching one tape.

Things have changed and copyright crimes are getting easier to trace. Once the people creating and distributing the media, will they come after the rest of us?

  Patr100 23:57 16 Oct 03

Just as an aside, my local streetmarket has the same people blatently selling obviously pirated DVDs froma small box of, for example Finding Nemo which has hardly hit the cinemas so I went to the Police office nearby a few hundred yards away - I expected I was not the first to inform them.Anyway the officer at the deask just said there is nothing they can do about it they do not have enough officers. "I am always being told that these sorts of things finance organised crime" I said. He agreed it does but he said they have to prioritise violent crime robbery etc. So they get way with it.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 00:10 17 Oct 03

'Anyway the officer at the deask just said there is nothing they can do about it they do not have enough officers'....there seems to be enough when you are driving at 40mph in a 30mph zone. /eyes raise

G

  IClaudio 15:55 17 Oct 03

...How many officers does it take to visit a Boot Sale on a Sunday morning? At my local, there are at least 5 people selling films on DVD (some released just days before...) and a couple more selling copies of the latest games and serious stuff (how about Dreamweaver MX Studio for a tenner? - I paid several hundred for it a few weeks ago, doh!)

In just 10 minutes (and the £1 admission), a plain clothes officer could earn enough brownie points for a week!

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