//some 3rd party need geo

To build or buy built? Now or later?

  nojs 10:49 10 Oct 04
Locked

Need some help please. I am after a new pc for games and surfing and have an idea of what I am after:-

Amd 64 3800 or fx53
939pin m/board
1 gb ram
6800 or x600 card
quiet psu
20" tft
and the usual extras dvdrw etc etc

I can get what I want from the usual suppliers like mesh or evesham or I can go for one from alien or for a more extreme water cooled pc from holly. For a price!

Am I going to save that much money by buying the components (probably from more than one supplier)and having a pc built? I would have to pay someone to build the machine so that cost needs to be taken into account.

Is it worth buying now or should I wait a little while longer? Reason being is the 64 bit isnt being used to its potential yet, and I have read that amd are to drop prices of its 64 bit chips mid october?

Any thoughts as to what I should be doing?

  Rayuk 11:13 10 Oct 04

You will not get the parts cheaper as you dont have the buying power Mesh etc have,just cost everything up and find a similar specced pre built one.I personally buld my own as I can then buy exactly what I want the satisfaction more than makes up for the extra few pounds involved.

You seem to be gettinng top of the range stuff apart from the graphics card,if you are a gamer I would have thought the 800XT would have been a better choice agp or pcie

  Mr Mistoffelees 11:23 10 Oct 04

Building one yourself, or buying the parts and having it assembled by someone else for you will get you exactly what you want. Buying a complete system from one of the big system builders WILL be cheaper though. Alienware and other specialists will build you something very nice but you will pay through the nose. As for your choice of graphics card, there is little difference in performance between an nVidia geforce 6800 and an ATI x800, but the ATI is both cheaper and much less power hungry. The x600 will be slower though.

  nojs 11:24 10 Oct 04

Your right about the graphics card I meant either a geforce 6800 or a radeon x800.

What about whether to buy now or later? Am I going to see the benefits of waiting for a month or so with the new 64bit technology?

Am I wasting my money if I buy a dearer pc from alienware or holly?? Am I going to see any real benefit or is it just for the really hardcore gamers out there?

  Rayuk 11:30 10 Oct 04

Theres never a right time unless you know for definate that prices will drop or a new component is due within a very very short time .

As for Alienware and Holly just check prices for what they offer with other competitors.
Have looked at Alienware before and think personally their prices are a bit over the top for what they offer.Within your budget and components I think it is fast enough without going into overclocking territory unless that side of computing apppeals to you.

In 6 months time a basic rig will most probably offer the same speeds anyway.

  tommyc352 11:32 10 Oct 04

Im in the same boat myself, but im intending to upgrade my Pc rather then buy a new one. As for waitin or buying now, one thing ive learnt with computers is that if you buy the current top end equipment now, you can be sure that it will be superceeded in the coming months.

Its a tough call for anyone to say when you should or shouldnt buy. Just put in the research first, especially with regards to compatibility etc.

  tommyc352 11:32 10 Oct 04

Im in the same boat myself, but im intending to upgrade my Pc rather then buy a new one. As for waitin or buying now, one thing ive learnt with computers is that if you buy the current top end equipment now, you can be sure that it will be superceeded in the coming months.

Its a tough call for anyone to say when you should or shouldnt buy. Just put in the research first, especially with regards to compatibility etc.

  georgemac 12:16 10 Oct 04

anyone building a new high spec power hungry pc, invest in a good quality power supply, don't scrimp here you could have problems.

A lot of the lower price psu's which claim to be 550 watt output are peak power output, the max power ratings are much lower, and in fact they deliver less power than an antec 350 watt psu.

  Forum Editor 12:37 10 Oct 04

1. Buy a ready-built machine. That way you'll be benefiting fromm the experience gained by the manufacturer over a long period as to which mix of components works well. You'll also have the protection of our very comprehensive consumer legislation if things go wrong.

2. The best time to buy a computer is always now - if you decide to wait until this or that component decreases in price you'll wait forever, and in the meantime you'll lose out on time that could have been spent enjoying the new machine. It's a fact that a relatively short while after you buy any computer you'll find that one component or another will be superceded by something more advanced. You can never stay ahead of the game, no matter how carefully you plan. New advances are not likely to mean quantum leaps in any case. Performance increments nowadays are generally so small as to be almost undetectable, and a really giant leap will be flagged several years in advance, so you'll get plenty of warning.

If you want to gamble on the possibility of price cuts wait until after Christmas. Early in the new year we'll see manufacturers reflecting on their Christmas sales figures, and whether or not they have met their targets. If Tens of thousands of little waynes and waynettas didn't get that megarocket 4.0 Xray500 machine that they wanted you might find them being unloaded at reduced prices to tempt the January sales market.

  nojs 12:56 10 Oct 04

Thanks for all the advice.

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