Brand awareness survey- comments please.

  musicbassman 08:30 20 Dec 04
Locked

I just started the PCA Brand Awareness survey, but gave up after completing 60% of it as the questions and assumptions made seemed so dumb.
The questions seem to imply that if you buy a product which you are pleased with, you will stick like glue to the same brand for your next purchase almost without question.
I suggest that most PCA readers are a bit more savvy than that and will do some homework looking at a whole range of options every time.
Also, many of the questions such as what your priorities were when choosing an item would apply to any item purchased and didn’t really need to be re-answered for every product.
I suggest that more intelligent questions could lead to more useful answers!

  GANDALF <|:-)> 08:45 20 Dec 04

You are not obliged to complete the survey and assuming that you do not work for a Public Opinion company I would suggest that you do not understand the way surveys work. One way is to discourage people whose ideas may not be beneficial or enlightening.

G

  musicbassman 08:58 20 Dec 04

- Hmmm..... maybe I should have titled this - 'polite and considerate comments please'

  anchor 09:24 20 Dec 04

Of course no-one is obliged to complete the survey; musicbassman was making a statement. I completed the survey, which I found tedious and the questions repetitious.

I have noticed lately that quite a few of your postings are rather acerbic. Politeness and courtesy cost nothing.

  vaughan007 10:03 20 Dec 04

Over the years a few of the pc advisor surveys have been a bit tedious to complete and very very long.

I dont really agree with you Gandalf. Too many questions that are too repetitive and a survey that is tedious simply means the following...

1. Most people are discouraged from completing it. Including those whose answers would be useful.

2. Everyone, except die hard survey fans, are bored by the end. Which may mean their answers actually become meaningless because they simply want to get the survey finished and get into the prize draw!

Giving the option to save the survey and the prize draw was obviously PCA's attempt to overcome this boredom problem. However, perhaps I could suggest that a series of smaller surveys, which can be completed in one sitting would be better and more interesting to the participants. Also, perhaps only those who complete each of the smaller surveys would be entered into the prize draw. For example, A survey a week for 4 weeks. Upon completion of all four surveys you are entered into the prize draw.

The argument against this is that nobody would complete all four surveys. However, my guess is that more people would complete all the little surveys than complete one big one.

If you need to be logged on to complete the survey then it would be straight forward to collate your answers. Essentially this would give the same results as one big survey. Except the answers would be more meaningful as the participant would not be bored to death by the end putting in any old answer.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 10:37 20 Dec 04

'I have noticed lately that quite a few of your postings are rather acerbic. Politeness and courtesy cost nothing'...I am touched that you are watching out for me in a fatherly manner and I am traumatised that you are upset.

'I suggest that most PCA readers are a bit more savvy than that and will do some homework looking at a whole range of options every time'....not in today's culture, a quick check on the huge rise in credit and impulse purchases would tend to suggest that the vast majority of purchases are 'on the spot' decisions. A quick check on the way advertising is targeted will confirm this.

'The questions seem to imply that if you buy a product which you are pleased with, you will stick like glue to the same brand for your next purchase almost without question'....25 years spent in advertising would seem to confirm that this is true. People like to think of themselves as unique but in reality they are creatures of habit or occasionally totally irrational. If someone buys one manufacturer's product and are happy with it the chances that they will replace it with another from the same manufacturer are high. You are assuming that people thoroughly check each item bought...they do not as they often try to find the easiest way. Advertisers realise this and use it to their advantage.


G

  v1asco 11:02 20 Dec 04

that no matter how hard I try my link to the survey does not work.

Perhaps the F.E. is going to send me the prize in any case?

Still, enjoy the Festive season all,thanks for your advice and comments,

Taffy

and Anchor maybe we can all come across a bit harsh at times, especially if we type in the same manner we speak. The tone cannot be heard.
Reading about Gandalf in The Book and watching him in the film demonstrates this well to me.

  Stuartli 12:58 20 Dec 04

GANDALF <|:-)> is quite right in that people tend to stick to the brands that they have found to be what they require and reliable, whether it's computer related or any other consumer field.

How many people, for instance, would drink Guinness one day in the pub and Tetley Mild the next?

Once you've discovered what suits you the tendancy is to stick with it until, or unless, you are let down.

Most of us are creatures of habit - that's why these forums prove so successful...:-)

  pj123 14:31 20 Dec 04

I don't do Survey's anymore. I did a two week stint as a Data Input Operator for a company that collates the data from many surveys.

From the answers I saw I got the impression that the people completing them were ticking the boxes that they thought was wanted rather than their own opinion. For example: a standard question is "What papers/magazines do you read" Who knows whether they are telling the truth or not?

I think vaughan007, item 2 sums it up. If you want to be entered into the prize draw tell them what you think they want to know.

  Starfox 14:33 20 Dec 04

Gandalf,

"If someone buys one manufacturer's product and are happy with it the chances that they will replace it with another from the same manufacturer are high."


Certainly applies to me,my first printer purchased many years ago was a HP and worked tirelessly for years,it just got outdated I would not dream if buying any other make due to this experience.

  Belatucadrus 15:52 20 Dec 04

In my opinion the survey is badly designed, in that anybody with any brand awareness or interest in products is presented with significantly more button clicking than somebody who has none. It is also very tedious clicking with a repetitious range of highly subjective questions. A lot of more aware subjects will as musicbassman did, either give up or start clicking "None of the above" just to speed things up. Far from " discouraging people whose ideas may not be beneficial or enlightening " it discourages those very people that's opinion and knowledge base it's supposed to be surveying. As a result the survey data skews the demographic of those likely to complete it and almost mandates corrupt input from some others. I'm sure the survey team will produce a jolly nice report with some very informative graphs, whether the data it's based on has any significance in the real world is open to debate.

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