AOL networking, (what can i buy?!!) URGENT!!!

  Viv-208691 14:26 07 Mar 04
Locked

Does anyone know if it is possible to network AOL (8.0 in my case) by using a wireless router which IS NOT the Thomson Speedtouch that AOL suggest?? This router seems overpriced to me, so I was considering buying a Linksys/Netgear one but need to know if it will work!!
Please reply, I need to share my broadband connection urgently!

Thanks

You SHOULD be able to share any connection that you have, be it AOL or any other using MOST wireless routers. The thing that MAY prevent this is whether the ISP demands the Mac addresses of the machines using the connection and if so, whether they will block more than one machine on the same connection.

However, there is a solution. You identify Linksys as a possibility and I would reccomend them to you. I have set up my own network using a Linksys WRT54G (On Nildram). Although Nildram dont watch your Mac addresses the Linksys has the capability to "Spoof Mac Addresses" which basically me4ans that any connected computer would appear to have the "Authorised" MAC address and therefore work.

The reson they do this is to prevent you getting together with your neighbors and sharing a connection whilst paying only one fee.

Another network I set up for a friend has who has NTL had just this problem and we had to spoof the addresses for three more computers - no problems at all.

Whatever the situation with the Mac addresses all (telephone) broadband signals are the same and the equipment that you use to receive them will work regardless of which ISP you are with. Most ISP's will have a "reccomended" router that they will offer you, normally because they have a large discount from the manufacturer and tend not to think that Jo Bloggs in the street knows about such retailers as Ebuyer or Dabs etc. Have a look on the net for their recomended router and see the difference in price!

Hope that helps.

  Viv-208691 16:26 07 Mar 04

Thankyou very much for writing that, v.helpful!! Excuse my ignorance but what exactly is a Mac adress and how is it 'spoofed?' Is this easy to do??

A "MAC" Address is the unique physical address that is given to each and every networking component. It comprises an alpha numeric 12 digit series and as I say, is unique to each and every device (think of it like a telehone number - no-one can ever have the same as someone else). If you start the command prompt in XP (Start - accessories - command prompt) and then type (ipconfig /all) without the brackets and look for "physical address" you will see the Mac address for your various adaptors (Ethernet, modem etc) whatever you have.

When you "Spoof" a mac address you are disguising the "Real" addresses with one address. So for example, say your "Real" address and the registered one with your ISP (If they register it) is AB-12-CD-34-56-78 the router will "assign" this address to all machines that connect to the network and "fool" the ISP into thinking that it is only one machine connecting. Going back to the telephone analogy think of a large office with loads of telephones. Each one has ots own number (mac address) but when they call out they pass through the "main" switchboard (the router) and to the outside world it is only the switchboards number that can be seen even though the call originated from a different number.

Is it easy to set up? With Linksys yes - they have an excellent user interface and even with no knowledge it is easily done (I had no clue before i brought my router).

A "MAC" Address is the unique physical address that is given to each and every networking component. It comprises an alpha numeric 12 digit series and as I say, is unique to each and every device (think of it like a telehone number - no-one can ever have the same as someone else). If you start the command prompt in XP (Start - accessories - command prompt) and then type (ipconfig /all) without the brackets and look for "physical address" you will see the Mac address for your various adaptors (Ethernet, modem etc) whatever you have.

When you "Spoof" a mac address you are disguising the "Real" addresses with one address. So for example, say your "Real" address and the registered one with your ISP (If they register it) is AB-12-CD-34-56-78 the router will "assign" this address to all machines that connect to the network and "fool" the ISP into thinking that it is only one machine connecting. Going back to the telephone analogy think of a large office with loads of telephones. Each one has ots own number (mac address) but when they call out they pass through the "main" switchboard (the router) and to the outside world it is only the switchboards number that can be seen even though the call originated from a different number.

Is it easy to set up? With Linksys yes - they have an excellent user interface and even with no knowledge it is easily done (I had no clue before i brought my router).

A "MAC" Address is the unique physical address that is given to each and every networking component. It comprises an alpha numeric 12 digit series and as I say, is unique to each and every device (think of it like a telehone number - no-one can ever have the same as someone else). If you start the command prompt in XP (Start - accessories - command prompt) and then type (ipconfig /all) without the brackets and look for "physical address" you will see the Mac address for your various adaptors (Ethernet, modem etc) whatever you have.

When you "Spoof" a mac address you are disguising the "Real" addresses with one address. So for example, say your "Real" address and the registered one with your ISP (If they register it) is AB-12-CD-34-56-78 the router will "assign" this address to all machines that connect to the network and "fool" the ISP into thinking that it is only one machine connecting. Going back to the telephone analogy think of a large office with loads of telephones. Each one has ots own number (mac address) but when they call out they pass through the "main" switchboard (the router) and to the outside world it is only the switchboards number that can be seen even though the call originated from a different number.

Is it easy to set up? With Linksys yes - they have an excellent user interface and even with no knowledge it is easily done (I had no clue before i brought my router).

A "MAC" Address is the unique physical address that is given to each and every networking component. It comprises an alpha numeric 12 digit series and as I say, is unique to each and every device (think of it like a telehone number - no-one can ever have the same as someone else). If you start the command prompt in XP (Start - accessories - command prompt) and then type (ipconfig /all) without the brackets and look for "physical address" you will see the Mac address for your various adaptors (Ethernet, modem etc) whatever you have.

When you "Spoof" a mac address you are disguising the "Real" addresses with one address. So for example, say your "Real" address and the registered one with your ISP (If they register it) is AB-12-CD-34-56-78 the router will "assign" this address to all machines that connect to the network and "fool" the ISP into thinking that it is only one machine connecting. Going back to the telephone analogy think of a large office with loads of telephones. Each one has ots own number (mac address) but when they call out they pass through the "main" switchboard (the router) and to the outside world it is only the switchboards number that can be seen even though the call originated from a different number.

Is it easy to set up? With Linksys yes - they have an excellent user interface and even with no knowledge it is easily done (I had no clue before i brought my router).

A "MAC" Address is the unique physical address that is given to each and every networking component. It comprises an alpha numeric 12 digit series and as I say, is unique to each and every device (think of it like a telehone number - no-one can ever have the same as someone else). If you start the command prompt in XP (Start - accessories - command prompt) and then type (ipconfig /all) without the brackets and look for "physical address" you will see the Mac address for your various adaptors (Ethernet, modem etc) whatever you have.

When you "Spoof" a mac address you are disguising the "Real" addresses with one address. So for example, say your "Real" address and the registered one with your ISP (If they register it) is AB-12-CD-34-56-78 the router will "assign" this address to all machines that connect to the network and "fool" the ISP into thinking that it is only one machine connecting. Going back to the telephone analogy think of a large office with loads of telephones. Each one has ots own number (mac address) but when they call out they pass through the "main" switchboard (the router) and to the outside world it is only the switchboards number that can be seen even though the call originated from a different number.

Is it easy to set up? With Linksys yes - they have an excellent user interface and even with no knowledge it is easily done (I had no clue before i brought my router).

oops!

Hell of a delay from hitting "Post response" the the page changing (despite 1Mbps connection) I thought the connection had dropped - sorry!

  Viv-208691 17:44 07 Mar 04

Thanks again ~ that's all really helpful.

  Viv-208691 18:42 07 Mar 04

So, if I were to buy this Linksys model: click here ...You (or anyone else!!) would be confident it will work even though I use AOL and they say the Thomson one is the only router they support??

Thanks again for your well explained advice.

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