custard apples or soursop

  sunnystaines 09:43 18 Aug 10
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does any eat this fruit?

We like this fruit a lot, but have always discarded the seeds.

been speaking to australians who eat the seeds also thais seem to eat them as well.

but trawling the web to look at their nutritional value many webs say they are inedible and some say toxic.

we were going to just ground the seeds up in blender when we make them into smoothies.

if you eat this fruit what do you do with the seeds?

  ella33 11:20 18 Aug 10

I am wondering if the fruit is slightly different where it grows naturally? So the seeds are softer? (As with mangos, the skin is eaten in some countries but is quite tough when the fruit gets here, though I shouldn't think anyone would eat the huge stone)

click here This is the Wikipedia information...it describes the fruit as "tasty and nutritious" and can make a sweet drink.

However at the end it says the whole plant is a source of hydrogen cyanide, which ties up with Fourm Member's reply.

  lotvic 11:31 18 Aug 10

or click here for Wikipedia on Soursop

There seem to be a lot of varieties

  sunnystaines 12:30 18 Aug 10

thanks for replies, been eating the fruit in various forms for years but always discarded the seeds.

the flesh once blended and and chilled is very refreshing in hot weather, buts its a pain getting the seeds out, only a recent talk with some aussies about the drink raised this question, also checked with some thai's but the webs put me off.

as for cyanide. apple pips have this but not enough to cause damage unless your a heavy apple eater, did read once of a cider worker dying from eating cider mush after the squeeking process the build up of cyanide in the pips killed him.

  sunnystaines 13:41 18 Aug 10

had a look on the net for the story about the cider worker but could not find it. The cider workers used to get a free meal of the mush from sqeezing of the apples, eating of a high amount of pips over time must have built up and killed him. The story was down in somerset or devon.

  ella33 22:37 18 Aug 10

I have always been told to be careful with crushed apple as any bruising of the flesh can cause quite serious stomach complaints. I don't actually remember that case.

I spoke to a Japanese friend, who has also lived in southern Asia. She says that the fruit is lovely and sweet but there are different types, to quote
"I know the fruit by many names: annona/cherimoya, depends on where you find them. I have seen it in Madeira, Mexico, Africa, and of course, Asia.

As it is a fruit, you do not cook it. Do not eat the skin, only the inside fleshy meaty parts. Never, ever eat the black pits. Important to remember that only eat this fruit when it is ripe; you'll know that by gently press on the fruit and if it feels soft to the touch then that piece is ready. Some people prefer to eat the fruit when it is very soft as the smooth inner flesh will be sweeter and more aromatic.

There are many ways to store less ripen fruits at home. One of the ways that taught to me is to store this fruit with rice grains in a bag or a container."

So those thoughts may be helpful to some. She also mentioned Durian fruit which apparantly is even more delicious but stinks like bad drains and she had some amusing stories about how to disguise the smaell. I believe that it is actually banned from public places! (The UK version is neither as sweet to eat, or as smelly!) Still that is another story

  Forum Editor 23:09 18 Aug 10

It was an unforgettable, and never to be repeated experience.

A 'bad drains' smell would seem like the best perfume in the world alongside the real odour of the Durian. The one that was presented to me had the smell of decomposing flesh, and it was almost impossible to get it near my mouth without gagging.

Carrying a Durian fruit on public transport is prohibited by law in Singapore, and when you smell a ripe one you know why.

  sunnystaines 07:45 19 Aug 10

When I used to spend a lot of time in china town use to eat these all the time found them moorish.

they stink if you smell them like french soft cheese but the taste/texture is very nice.

now very rarely go china town so no not get the chance to eat them very often now.

knew a shop that would prepare them.

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