While much of the enterprise mobility discussion has concerned bring-your-own-device (BYOD) and choose-your-own-device (CYOD), another conundrum is managing the profileration of bring-your-own-application (BYOA), according to Frost and Sullivan Australia and New Zealand (A/NZ) head of research, Audrey William.

William said users have the power to download whichever apps they prefer, and often bypass IT measures in place to restrict this.

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This means a successful enterprise mobility strategy is not only about technology trends and supporting a range of devices using various operating systems through policies and governance. Although these continue to be challenges, the new tier is concerned with integrating the software side of things through a heterogenous environment.

But while its a different acronym, William said the question remains the same: how does the IT manager protect enterprise data and maintain control over the applications employees are using?

With BYOA, the issue is monitoring not only which applications are being downloaded onto employee devices and brought into the network, but what corporate information is being utilised through these.

Security is evidently the overarching theme, and remains the number one priority for enterprise mobility strategies, according to Frost and Sullivan.

Is this all a bit over the top?

In outlining the BYOA threat landscape, William cites the growth in availability of and access to over-the-top (OTT) services and social collaboration tools.

While some services, such as Yammer, have earned the trust of organisations, the sharing of confidential information and other corporate data through the likes of WhatsApp, for example, can be dangerous. IT managers therefore have this extra element with which to deal.

William said Frost and Sullivan forecasts the numbers of OTT services to grow, posing further security questions as a result of the widening landscape.