8 things you can do with the BBC micro:bit

From a simple rock, paper, scissors game to a music-making arpeggiator, you can do many things with the BBC micro:bit.

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  • Intro
  • Rock, paper, scissors
  • Compass
  • Pocket pet
  • Pedometer
  • Metronome
  • Fruit arpeggiator
  • Steady hands
  • Rocket car
  • More stories
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BBC micro:bit projects

The micro:bit is aimed at kids and is being given out to every Year 7 pupil in the UK at the moment. It’s easy to use and has some useful features like a built-in 5x5 LED array, Bluetooth and an on-board compass. Here are 8 things you can use the micro:bit to do, ranging from the easy to the (almost) impossible.

Also, did you know you can program the micro:bit wirelessly from an iPhone or Android phone (or tablet)? Just install the official iOS app or the official Android app.

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The micro:bit is aimed at kids and is being given out to every Year 7 pupil in the UK at the moment. It’s easy to use and has some useful features like a built-in 5x5 LED array, Bluetooth and an on-board compass. Here are 8 things you can use the micro:bit to do, ranging from the easy to the (almost) impossible.

Also, did you know you can program the micro:bit wirelessly from an iPhone or Android phone (or tablet)? Just install the official iOS app or the official Android app.

BBC micro:bit projects

It’s possible to program your micro:bit to play rock, paper, scissors. Each time you shake it, it will display the image of a rock, paper or scissors at random. Here’s how to do it.

BBC micro:bit projects

Use the on-board magnetometer to display in which direction the micro:bit is pointing. The tutorial on how to code it is on the official micro:bit website.

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BBC micro:bit projects

Using a couple of sachets of Sugru (which are available as part of the £12.50 Project Pack) you can make a cute-looking micro:bit that displays different ‘faces’ according to its mood. A bit like a Tamagotchi Coding instructions can be found on the Tech will save us website.

There's a different digital pet program you can code by following the tutorial on the micro:bit website.

BBC micro:bit projects

Tracking fitness is big business these days. You can get your micro:bit to count the number of steps you take with just the board itself, plus the battery pack (and AAA batteries, obviously). You’ll find the tutorial here.

BBC micro:bit projects

This project was developed with musician Will.i.am and uses a piezo buzzer as well as the micro:bit’s display to beep and flash at a certain tempo. You can find out how to code the project.

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BBC micro:bit projects

Yes, you can connect your micro:bit up to an apple. With a few other simple components and some code, you can turn it into a touch-activated tone generator, and then play musical scales using fruit. For the full tutorial click here

BBC micro:bit projects

As well as the 'official' micro:bit projects on the www.microbit.co.uk site, there are many others. Samsung has developed an Android app which lets you do fun things with your micro:bit. One is the Steady Hand game which uses the board's accelerometer to detect how many times the contestent wobbles while standing on one leg, or tackling an obstacle course before the game is over. For more, see Samsung's micro:bit site.

BBC micro:bit projects

Ok, so this one isn’t going to be possible for many people, but if you have access to multiple micro:bits and a stash of black-powder rockets, you can make a model car and use the micro:bit to see how fast it goes. It’s actually a competition run in conjunction with the Bloodhound Project and involves children from various schools making their own cars and using their micro:bits as a rudimentary telemetry system.

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