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Samsung has removed every trace of its Galaxy Tab 7.7 from the company booth at the IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin. The Galaxy Tab 7.7 was one of the products introduced during the Samsung press conference, but after just about 2 days on the show floor, the product vanished. A PR spokesman at the booth had little to say. Apple is suing Samsung to stop sales of the 7.7's big brother, the Galaxy Tab 10.1, claiming that Samsung copied the design iPad 2. Recently a German court upheld a preliminary injunction ordering Samsung to stop selling the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in that country. Samsung's lawyers must have anticipated the possibility that the court's ruling would apply to the smaller tablet too. When it was demonstrated by Samsung staff the 7.7 had a prominent warning sticker. Samsung covered up the signage for the tablet as well. You can see in the before and after images in this video. In one image a backlit sign for the Galaxy Tab 7.7 is visible, but by Sunday it was replaced with an advertisement for the Note. On one of the walls at the booth it looked as if a piece of text was slapped over what previously advertised the Tab 7.7. The change likely wasn’t easy. Signage needed to be printed overnight and the hardware at the booth needed to be replaced. Not to mention the tens of thousands of consumers and press walking the show floor won’t be able to try out the product. European intellectual property laws allow companies to protect to the appearance of their products, in addition to the copyright, patent and trademark rights recognized in other jurisdictions. Apple claims the appearance of the larger Galaxy Tab is too similar to that of its iPad 2, the design of which is registered with the European Union's Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market.

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LG is using its Dual Play technology to entice gamers into buying its 3D televisions. Normally in multiplayer games, the screen is split, but with dual play gamers can view the full screen with each player seeing a separate image. 3D TVs work by sending different images to each eye and Dual Play uses that to its advantage by sending one set of images to one player and another set with another player. Where typical polarized 3D glasses would have a left and right eye, the dual play glasses have one set with two left eyes and another set with two right eyes. And even though the TV supports 3D in dual play games are shown in traditional 2D. Dual Play works with any LG cinema 3D TV and the glasses will begin shipping along with LW980 series television by the end of September. LG also said that users could make their own Dual Play glasses simply by switching out lenses. LG wasn’t the first company with this idea thought. In June at E3, Sony showed a TV that creates the same, though it only measured 24-inches. The Dual Play technology demonstrates another use of 3D technology and with it Sony and LG are hoping to convince more consumers to upgrade from their traditional 2D displays. 3D gaming content has proved especially helpful in the transition.