The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) has temporarily moved its trades from Knight Capital's IT systems to those of rival GETCO, following a trading software glitch at the financial services firm.

Knight revealed last week that on the 1 August it experienced a problem with the installation of its trading software, which resulted in it sending numerous erroneous orders in NYSE-listed securities into the market. It has since said that the "software has been removed from the company's systems".

NYSE and NYSE MKT, which deals with the trading of small growth companies, have "temporarily assigned" trading responsibility for more than 670 securities to GETCO, the exchange reported today.

GETCO will assume responsibility for Knight's market maker unit, otherwise known as NYSE's trading floor activity, where it has an obligation to keep the stock market fair and orderly, and facilitate price discovery throughout the day, as well as at the open, close and in periods of high volatility.

In a statement, NYSE said that exchange rules permit the temporarily reallocation of any security when it is in the public interest to do so.

Knight Capital confirmed today that a consortium of Wall Street firms would inject $400 million (£256 million) into the company in an attempt to reverse the damage caused by the glitch.

The convertible share placement agreement, which would give the firms control of the broker, involves GETCO, Blackstone Equity, Ameritrade and Stifel.

NYSE added that it is waiting upon the completion and approval of this recapitalisation plan before staff, operations and systems oversight for the securities are returned to Knight.

"We believe this interim transition is in the best interests of investors, our listed issuers, market stability and efficiency, as well as Knight, as the firm finalises its equity financing transaction," said Larry Liebowitz, chief operation officer, NYSE Euronext.

"Our first priority is to ensure market integrity and an orderly trading environment in which investors and all market participants have confidence."