Football fans are being warned the official FIFA World Cup mobile app contains major flaws which lead to consistent crashes and failed requests.

That's according to Compuware analysis, which found the app crashes consistently when trying to view Brazilian team information, randomly when checking for fragments, and when trying to reload following a failure to load news on the initial page.

A spokeperson for Compuware said the crashes were likely to impact a significant number of users considering the number of fans likely to rely on the app to check the latest World Cup news and given the popularity of five-times winner, Brazil. "The causes of the problems range include an empty array, a deprecated library and an unknown developer issue that appears to involve the database," a spokesperson said. To gauge the mobile app user experience, Compuware also examined a number of attributes relating to performance and responsiveness including the time required to load images, videos, and statistics.

A spokesperson said most requests were executed very quickly, in less than one second.

"However, Compuware warns that inefficiencies in the way the app accesses information from the database could lead to problems for users and for the data centre when the World Cup is in full swing."

Compuware APM technical strategist, Klaus Enzenhofer, said the reality was that mobile apps were incredibly complex, but developers are often being forced to rush them out in ever shorter timescales to keep up with market demands.

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"As a result, there often isn't the time to test them as rigorously as applications should, and indeed would have been in the past," he said.

"However, the sheer number of factors that can impact on an app's performance; from inefficient coding, to the mobile network and even the handset itself, means that businesses simply can't afford not to have visibility into the experience of every single user if they are to guarantee a high quality service.

"Let's just hope FIFA is able to iron out these teething troubles by the time the World Cup kicks off, or there are going to be some very disappointed football fans out there."

The software problems were identified by Compuware using its Auto Instrumentation feature for Mobile Real User Monitoring.