Best bike accessories 2017 UK | Best bike gadgets for cycling

Whether it's sunny, rainy, light or dark there's a wealth of bike accessories you can get. We round up some of the best bike lights, cycle computers, speakers and the latest tech gadgets that can enhance your ride and keep you safe.

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  • Moon Comet lights
  • Dog & Bone Locksmart Mini
  • Ass-savers Extended
  • Garmin Edge 820
  • CYCL WingLights
  • Garmin Varia Vision
  • PNY Expand
  • Wahoo Tickr
  • GoPro Hero Session
  • Beeway Wireless computer
  • Scosche BoomBottle
  • EasyAcc bike lights
  • More stories
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Moon Comet lights

Moon Comet

At £45 from Ribble Cycles this bike light set uses a strip of modern COB-style LEDs which are insanely bright (100 lumens for the front light). They come with handy quick-release rubber mounts that attach in seconds to your handlebar and seat post so you can transfer them from bike to bike without tools.

Their batteries last a good few hours - a couple of weeks of commuting for me - and recharge via USB, and come with the necessary mini USB cables, so you can charge them from your PC.

If £45 is a bit rich for you, keep an eye out for when Aldi and Lidl sell clones for around £6.99 per light - £14 for what appears to be identical lights is good value.

Also see: Best Black Friday Gadget Deals

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Moon Comet

At £45 from Ribble Cycles this bike light set uses a strip of modern COB-style LEDs which are insanely bright (100 lumens for the front light). They come with handy quick-release rubber mounts that attach in seconds to your handlebar and seat post so you can transfer them from bike to bike without tools.

Their batteries last a good few hours - a couple of weeks of commuting for me - and recharge via USB, and come with the necessary mini USB cables, so you can charge them from your PC.

If £45 is a bit rich for you, keep an eye out for when Aldi and Lidl sell clones for around £6.99 per light - £14 for what appears to be identical lights is good value.

Also see: Best Black Friday Gadget Deals

Dog & Bone Locksmart Mini

Still use a key to lock up your bike? Pah, that's so 2014. These days the cool kids are using Bluetooth padlocks like the Locksmart mini. Using a phone app might not seem particularly convenient compared to a key, but chances are you're more likely to forget your keys than your phone, so it could turn out to be more convenient if you're the sort which does regularly lock yourself out of the house. No PIN is needed either, just an iPhone or Android with Bluetooth 4.

The lock is weather-proof and the batteries are rechargeable and last for a claimed two years between charges. You'll still need a chain of course, as this is a small padlock for locking the chain around a bike rack. At £100 from Amazon, it is a bit on the pricey side - twice the price of a traditional Kryptonite lock.

Read our full Locksmart Mini review

Ass-savers Extended

There are loads of mudguards, but the Ass-Savers Extended is a cheap and simple way to avoid a wet bottom. Made from flexible plastic, you can keep it in your bag until it's needed. Then it simply clips onto any standard saddle rails and catches any water flicked up by your rear wheel.

It's £6.99 from CycleSurgery in various colours.

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Garmin Edge 820

The Edge 820 is Garmin's latest bike satnav, and it's superb. It will calculate a cycle-friendly route to a destination - or you can plan your own route - and get turn-by-turn directions while you're cycling. It also works as an advanced bike computer, displaying and recording all your stats as you ride and will also show you an elevation profile so you can see whether it's uphill or downhill ahead.

It's compatible with a range of ANT+ accessories, including heart-rate monitor, speed and cadence sensor and Garmin's new range of bike lights and heads-up display (see next slide). There's Bluetooth and Wi-Fi so you can sync routes and ride stats to your phone, and also get call alerts and text messages on the Edge's screen. 

The screen is much better than earlier Edge models and is very easy to see when the sun is shining on it. The touchscreen also works if you're wearing gloves, and in the rain.

If you can't stretch to £329.99, the cheaper Edge 820 Explore lacks only features really serious cyclists would use, and is better value at £279.99 from Halfords.

CYCL WingLights

Sticking your arm out to signal you're turning can be dangerous, whether because you're not a confident rider or because of a tricky road junction that forces you to keep both hands on the bars.

The answer is WingLights, which are essentially car indicators for your bike. They come in two versions: one is a fixed set that stays on the bike and which costs £26.99 from Amazon.

The second set costs £37.99 from Amazon but has strong magnetic fittings so you can remove them when you lock up your bike. 

They flash at the same rate as a car and have two LEDs opposite each other: you can mount them so they're visible front and rear or top and bottom. A push button on the end makes it easy to turn them on and off, even with gloves on.

They're not as bright as car indicators, but are very easy to see at dusk or at night, which is when you'll most need drivers - and pedestrians - to see them.

They attach using a friction fit inside your handle bars, so require you to chop off the ends of your rubber handle grips.

Garmin Varia Vision

This heads-up display is much like Google Glass, but for cycling. It works with a compatible Garmin Edge computer (not with a smartphone, sadly) to beam turn directions and a wealth of other information directly into your eye. 

It's quite bulky and heavy, and does somewhat block your vision in one eye as it's not transparent like Google Glass but once you're used to it, it's genuinely useful. As with the Edge computer itself, you can decide exactly what information you want to see, and it can automatically scroll between information screens so you don't have to use the touch-sensitive 'scroll pad' on the side. 

It comes with two quick-release mounts so you can wear it on two different pairs of sunglasses, but it's not well suited to wireframe glasses. 

Battery life is excellent, but the price is the main downfall: at £319.99 from Amazon, it's virtually as expensive as the Edge computer on which it relies.

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PNY Expand

Since your phone already has GPS, it's a cheap way to get a bike satnav. PNY's Expand Bike Mount offers a sturdy, safe way to clamp your phone to your handlebars. 

As well as the usual spring clamp that holds the sides of your phone, there are four elastic bands which hook over the four corners of your phone. They stretch a lot, so can even accommodate a 5.5in iPhone in a case. 

The opposing threads in the clamp that attaches the mount to your handlebars mean it's quick to remove and install it on your bike, and the phone clamp is detachable from the bike clamp if you don't want to remove it entirely from your bike.

As it's new, it's hard to buy the PNY Expand in the UK, but it can be shipped from Amazon Germany where you can buy it for 26 Euros.

Wahoo Tickr

If you're training to get fit for a long ride, a heart-rate monitor will allow you to see in realtime whether you're pushing hard enough - or too hard. The Tickr works with your phone via Bluetooth, or with a bike GPS that uses the ANT+ standard (such as Garmin's Edge range).

It's a well-priced chest strap at just £37.68 from Amazon  - a Fitbit Charge HR costs significantly more. (See all our activity tracker reviews.)

GoPro Hero Session

Whether you're recording your ride for posterity or because you want the bike equivalent of a dash cam, the GoPro Hero Session is ideal. It's small and light and easily mounted to your bike helmet. It's waterproof so doesn't need a special plastic housing which all but blocks the microphones, so you'll get a nice soundtrack too.

As well as recording in 1440p, it can take time-lapse photos or a burst of photos. It costs £159.99 from Currys and you can read our full GoPro Hero session review for the finer points.

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Beeway Wireless computer

While you could spend hundreds on a GPS computer which will direct your around your route (well worth the money if you can afford it) you can equally get some useful stats from a computer costing less than £10.

The Beeway 546C is wireless, so installation is neat and pretty easy. Once set up for your wheel size it will display your speed, but also a trip distance, average speed and a backlight. It comes with batteries and a fitting kit, so you can't ask for more for your £8.99 from Amazon

Scosche BoomBottle

Cycling with music is more fun, but wearing headphones is dangerous. The BoomBottle fits into a standard drinks bottle carrier on your bike and plays tunes wirelessly via Bluetooth from your phone or a Bluetooth-equipped MP3 player. It doesn't support the higher-quality aptX codec, which you might expect at this price, but as the listening environment is far from ideal, it doesn't matter at all: the BoomBottle is loud enough and should last for the longest of rides.

You can buy the BoomBottle for £100 from Amazon.

EasyAcc bike lights

Although they're sold separately, both of these lights offer something unusual.

The first is the torch, which is powered by three AAA batteries. It's a well-made LED torch, but comes with a handlebar mount so you can use it as a bike light as well. Repeated pressing of the button on the end changes the mode from constantly on to flashing and an extra-bright mode. It's great value at only £6.99 from Amazon.

The rear light - £9.99 from Amazon - is solar powered and is claimed to provide up to six hours' light once fully charged. It can be mounted to the rails of a standard saddle, or a standard rear mudguard. There are no buttons. Instead it senses vibration and turns on while you're cycling. Because of this, you can't choose the mode: it only flashes. 

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