Most executives are still having difficulties when it comes to Cloud implementation, according to a new report.

Published by The Economist Intelligence Unit, the report titled Preparing for the next-generation Cloud: Lessons learned and insights shared showed 67 per cent of those surveyed had experienced some problem with Cloud implementation.

The results also showed that executives are more likely to blame internal issues for these problems than a service provider.

Attribution of fault was directed internally 36 per cent of the time, while service providers were assumed to be responsible for implementation issues 29 per cent of the time.

The report stated that this highlighted a need for IT departments to improve their own skills around Cloud computing. Commercial errors are the most common type of supplier failure.

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CEB IT practice leader, Mark Tonsetic, said the conversation around Cloud had shifted.

"It is not as much the cost question it used to be," he said.

"The key driver for the Cloud is to satisfy the speed to market and agility expectations coming from the enterprise."

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According to the report, best practices for businesses include improving integration with existing systems and considering business objectives beyond controlling costs.

The report drew on a survey of 232 global IT executives, conducted January to February 2015.

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