IT professionals in China and Hong Kong are happy to run their data centres at a higher temperature, according to a newly released Enlogic survey.

Findings of the survey indicate that 85 per cent of Greater China data centre professionals want to turn the temperature up to 25 Centigrade (77 Fahrenheit) or higher.

60 percent of the respondents in Hong Kong felt safe running a data centre at up to 25 C while 51 per cent in Shanghai said it was safe to operate at up to 30 C.

Enlogic questioned attendees at the DatacenterDynamics Conferences (DCD) in Hong Kong in July and Shanghai in September 2013 for this survey. The 2013 Uptime Institute Data Centre Industry Survey shows that only 7 per cent of the respondents across the globe operated at 23.8 C or higher.

"Data centre operators in the Greater China region could well lead the way towards establishing greener data centres with this awareness that a data centre can operate efficiently even at a higher temperature," said Mike Jansma, co-founder and chief marketing officer, Enlogic.

Training for managing systems

While Enlogic recommends proper training for management of these systems effectively, respondents from both the surveys find redundancy and hot-swappable technology as an effective way to cut downtime in their data centres.

Jansma says trained data centre staff members can use data for more precise energy management and capacity planning. Ultimately, these two capabilities will improve uptime and energy use in the long term.

Either ways the respondents should learn to run their data centres at a lower temperature because the "allowable range" is between 15 and 32 C as per the most ASHRAE TC9.9 specification.

Recognised as the global standard for data centre environmental operating conditions, the ASHRAE TC9.9 specification recommends range between 18 and 27 C.

"The data centre industry is booming in Asia, especially in Greater China and power consumption will be enormous, so every little saving in energy use counts," added Jansma. "Most of the data centres in Greater China are fairly new. As such, there is an opportunity to integrate more advanced devices that intelligently measure energy and power use."