Australian organisations are favouring private and hybrid Cloud deployments, while As-a-Service has surged in the past year, according to the latest VMware Cloud Index report.

The 2013 index found 36 per cent of respondents indicated that in 2013 and 2014 they were more likely to invest time, money, and skills around privateClouds while 34 per cent were looking to invest in hybrid cloud.

Cloud Storage - Comparison of 30 Services

Only 14 per cent were keen to invest in public Cloud according to the report.

When asked about the drivers of considering private Cloud, 44 per cent said it was to improve IT operational efficiency and budget performance and 42 per cent said to provide faster access to data and analytics to improve business decisions.

The figures for hybrid cloud were 34 per cent and 22 per cent, respectively; and lower again for public cloud offerings (9 per cent and 11 per cent). A private cloud approach also proved dominant in delivering mobility strategies (38 per cent) and powering an as-a-service strategy (37 per cent). An interesting observation was how closely aligned the private and hybrid cloud approaches were when addressing requirements like maintaining service level agreements with less funds or fewer IT resources (private: 33 per cent, hybrid: 31 per cent); Improving IT agility and responsiveness to business demands (private: 34 percent, hybrid: 35 per cent); and formalising or improving disaster recovery and business continuity (private: 39 per cent, hybrid: 38 per cent). Across the spectrum of all requirements asked, public Cloud was the least favoured approach to delivering these outcomes (ranging from 8 per cent to 15 per cent).

However, growth in the VMware powered service provider community would suggest that having a common, consistent and proven platform between private and public clouds eases the migration of existing workloads into these environments.

VMware managing director A/NZ Duncan Bennet, said Cloud uptake had increased rapidly in recent years and that many companies were no realising the benefits and challenges different Cloud environment could bring.

"Private Cloud and hybrid Cloud brings a robust approach to security, for organisations that are concerned about the safety of their data and the reliability of their cloud services," he said.

According to the VMware Cloud Index studies that started in 2010, Cloud adoption has been increasing in Australia during the past several years.

Compared to 2012, for example, respondents that have adopted or have plans to adopt cloud or 'as-a-service' approaches increased from 78 percent last year to 79 percent in 2013. But The importance of cloud computing to drive business transformation is also increasing.

When asked to rate the relevance of cloud computing and as-a-service approaches to the organization, 51 per cent of business decision makers said cloud or 'as-a-service' approaches are a "top priority for (their) organization and significantly impacts business transformation."

However, only 30 per cent of IT decision makers agreed.

Furthermore, when asked to rate the level of significance and impact of a software-defined approach to implement and manage datacentre resources such as servers, storage, networks over the next 2-3 years, 54 per cent said significant or highly significant. Forrester Consulting vice president and research director, Michael Barnes, said it was clear the software-defined approach was disrupting the marketplace, providing tremendous opportunity and growth prospects for both IT departments and the ecosystem in general to add value to organizations and grow businesses. "The software-defined data center is the IT architecture for the mobile cloud era, and can help IT realign and help drive business transformation in Australia," he said.