JIRA is an industrial-strength issue tracking tool that can help any team take better control of their software development projects.

The program can be used in many different ways. You might set it up to track bugs, for instance, and developers can interact with JIRA directly from Eclipse, IntelliJ IDEA, Flexbuilder, JDeveloper, NetBeans, Zend Studio and more (Atlassian say Visual Studio support is due soon).

JIRA also integrates with many version control systems, including Subversion, Perforce, ClearCase, Mercurial, Bazaar and many others. You can create new bug reports directly from your browser, email or smartphone client, and detailed activity histories make it easy to track recently opened issues.

JIRA works well as a high-level project tracker and management tool. You're able to define your own workflows, set up users, assign issues either manually or automatically, and define permissions to control what each team member can do. A project browser summarises your projects, covering recent activities, milestones, changelogs and road maps, but you can also drill down into the detail with a vary array of reporting options. And it's possible to export results to Excel for additional analysis.

And hundreds of plugins add all kinds of other features, from the ability to create detailed diagrams within a JIRA issue, to interfacing with CRM apps like Salesforce and SugarCRM, time tracking tools, helpdesk solutions and more.


A powerful bug tracker and management tool. The precise cost of JIRA depends on whether you opt for the hosted solution, or deploy it yourself, and how many licences you'll need, but the starting prices are low: install it on your own server and you can be licenced for up to 10 users for a mere $10.