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Samsung SSD 840 / 840 Pro review: every model tested

We reviewed every single model in Samsung’s SSD 840 and SSD 840 Pro series

Samsung 840 Pro

We were very impressed by the 256 GB Samsung 840 Pro when it came out late September. It was the fastest at the time, but OCZ has caught up already with the Vector SSD. The other capacities of the 840 Pro are equally outstanding in terms of performance, all at the top of their class. See also: Samsung SSD 840 Pro 256GB review: the fastest SSD currently around and Samsung SSD 840 250GB review: affordable and fast?

Late September Samsung launched the 840 Pro and 840 SSD series, both using the new Samsung MDX controller.  It turned out that the Samsung 840 Pro was the fastest SSD at time, even if the OCZ Vector has now managed to catch up. The Samsung 840 stood out because it was the first SSD to employ triple level cell memory. This makes the SSDs cheaper to make. In the original review, Hardware.Info only tested the Samsung 840 Pro 256 GB and the Samsung 840 250 GB models. Here follows the review of the other models. See all storage reviews.

The 840 Pro is Samsung's flagship SSD series. For an in-depth review of the hardware inside, please have a look at the original Samsung 840 Pro review.  The 840 Pro is available in three capacities: 128 GB (£122), 256 GB (£206) and 512 GB (£432). That translates to £0.95 per GB, £0.80 per GB  and £0.84 per GB, respectively. They all come with Samsung's own data migration software, and five years of warranty.

The 840's use the same controller, but instead have Triple Level Cell memory. To learn more about these flash chips, read our original Samsung 840 250 GB review. For normal use this chips are fine according to our calculations, but we'd be cautious if you make intensive use of your PC. The reason for this is that the lifespan can potentially be shorter than with traditional flash chips. It's also why they employ a lot of overprovisioning and have lower available capacities: 120 GB (£84), 250 GB (£147) and 500 GB (£358). That's £0.70 per GB, £0.59 per GB and £0.71 per GB, respectively. That's relatively affordable, but the difference isn't big enough compared to the previous generation, in our opinion. For a little more you can get the kit with 3.5-inch installation bracket, a USB-to-SATA cable and data migrations software.

The rest of this review you can read on Hardware.Info.

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