We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
 

Nvidia GTX 660 Ti review – including SLI and 3-way SLI

Graphics card built for gamers

Nvidia promised the GeForce GTX 660 Ti to be a graphics card that is ideally suited to gamers who play on a single full hd screen. After our extensive tests, we have to agree. With the exception of Metro 2033 all games we tested with are eminently playable at full hd resolution using high quality settings. Often the best possible settings combined with 4x AA still resulted in playable frame rates. If you want sufficient performance in full hd under any circumstance at any setting, you still have to dig deeper into your wallet for a card like the GTX 680. If you don't mind to occasionally turn down the settings just a little, the GTX 660 Ti is an excellent choice. See also: eVGA GTX 660 Ti review

Today, Nvidia introduces the GeForce GTX 660 Ti. This new GPU should end up in graphics cards in the £235 segment, where it is supposed to challenge AMD's Radeon HD 7870 and 7950. Nvidia claims the 660 Ti is the ultimate card for 3D gaming on a Full HD display. To put that claim to the test, the folks at Hardware.Info benchmarked GeForce GTX 660 Ti cards from ASUS, EVGA and MSI. They were also able to test the card's performance in SLI and 3-way SLI configurations. See also: Group test: what's the best graphics card?

Nvidia's youngest scion, the GeForce GTX 660 Ti, is based on the same GK104 'Kepler' chip as the GeForce GTX 680 introduced in March and the GeForce GTX 670 launched in May. Since the GTX 660 Ti is based on the same GPU as its bigger siblings, the features are identical. The GeForce GTX 660 Ti closely resembles the GTX 670 in terms of specifications. Again it features 1344 shader units with clock frequencies of 915 MHz for the GPU, with a 980 MHz boost and the memory running at 1502 MHz. The only real difference is that the memory bus has been reduced to 192 bits. This was easily achieved; as you may remember the memory controller consists of four 64-bit segments, which means Nvidia merely had to disable one. The GeForce GTX 660 Ti does however have the same amount of video memory. Nvidia managed this by linking two 64-bit memory controller segments to 512 MB (two 2 gigabit chips) and linking one segment to 1 GB memory (four 2 gigabit chips).

Hardware.Info benchmarked the new card with 3DMark Vantage, 3DMark11, Aliens versus Predator, Batman: Arkham City, Battlefield 3, Crysis 3, Dirt 3, Hard Reset, Heaven 2.5, Metro 2033, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, Total War Shogun 2 and Unreal 3. In addition we measured power consumption and noise production of three brands’ production samples. Also, we compared performance difference with AMD’s direct competitors HD 7870 and HD 7950 (which was recently boosted by a BIOS update). So there are 25 pages in total of benchmarks and analysis prefacing their conclusions – ideal if you wish to know everything there is to know about this card.

Quote the Hardware.Info whitecoats: “Nvidia promised the GeForce GTX 660 Ti to be a graphics card that is ideally suited to gamers who play on a single full hd screen. After our extensive tests, we have to agree. With the exception of Metro 2033 all games we tested with are eminently playable at full hd resolution using high quality settings. Often the best possible settings combined with 4x AA still resulted in playable frame rates. If you want sufficient performance in full hd under any circumstance at any setting, you still have to dig deeper into your wallet for a card like the GTX 680. If you don't mind to occasionally turn down the settings just a little, the GTX 660 Ti is an excellent choice."

Read the full GeForce GTX 660 Ti comparison review on Hardware.info.

nVidia GeForce GTX 660 Ti

IDG UK Sites

Samsung Gear 2 review: Classy Tizen smartwatch is too expensive

IDG UK Sites

Eight possible names for the next version of Mac OS X: What will Apple call the follow-up to Maveri?......

IDG UK Sites

Why our gadgets will kill us all: bleating notifications, too many chargers and the proliferation...

IDG UK Sites

Inside Twitter's new design and ad offerings