2016 was a huge year from games, from AAA titles like Battlefield 1 and Dark Souls 3 to indie gems including Firewatch and Inside. Plenty of these have hit the PC, and so there's never been a better time to be gaming from a computer.

Also see: Best Games Deals

With that in mind, we've decided to round up what we think are the best PC games available today, and we'll be updating it with 2017's best releases as we get the chance to play them. They cover every genre and every budget, from blockbuster shooters to indie puzzlers, but they've all got one thing in common: they're absolutely brilliant.

And in case you're a console gamer too, be sure to check out our guides to the best PS4 games and best Xbox One gamesIf you want to find out more about what the Game Pro team at Tech Advisor are playing, you can follow us on Twitter at @GameProUK for all of the latest games reviews, news and rumours.

Overwatch

Overwatch
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  • RRP: £40

Overwatch has quickly become one of the biggest online multiplayer shooters around, its mix of colourful characters and frenetic gameplay making it popular with casual players and eSports pros alike.

Following in the footsteps of PC classic Team Fortress 2, it's a team-based shooter with a variety of characters and varied objectives, requiring teamwork (and a balanced group of heroes) to achieve victory.

Overwatch has the same bright, fun sense of humour as Team Fortress 2, backing it up with even more varied character designs than that game. You can quickly jump between controlling a cowboy, a ninja, or a sentient gorilla, then switch to a robot or a time-travelling cockney in case you get bored - and that's just a handful of the 20+ characters, with more on the way.

Blizzard has an almost unparalleled reputation as a developer, and their first foray into the FPS is no exception. It's the perfect game to keep you entertained until Valve stop making digital hats and announce Team Fortress 3 already.

Read more in our full Overwatch review.

Firewatch

Firewatch
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  • RRP: £15.99

Firewatch was one of the surprise indie hits of the summer, coming almost out of nowhere to deliver a tight, compelling narrative set in one of the most beautiful virtual worlds ever built.

You play a fire lookout named Henry, watching over a US national forest in the late ‘80s. You’re in radio contact with the next lookout over, Delilah, but are otherwise entirely isolated in the Wyoming wilderness. The gameplay consists mostly of talking to Delilah over the radio, selecting from various conversation prompts, and exploring the lush landscapes as you try to solve a slowly unfolding mystery.

The mystery driving the narrative is compelling stuff, but the relationship between Henry and Delilah is where the game's writing really shines. It's sweet and genuine, and by the end of the four-hour story you're likely to really care about the pair of them.

Still, strong as the writing is, the best part of Firewatch lies in its unbelievable visuals. The Shoshone National Forest is recreated in lavish detail, and just exploring the space is so absorbing that developer Campo Santo added a free-roam mode after launch for players to wander round to their hearts' content.

Battlefield 1

Battlefield 1
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  • RRP: £55

Battlefield 1 takes the iconic FPS series back to basics, with a return to the war to end all wars, offering a take on World War I that's surprisingly thoughtful and sophisticated.

The campaign is split up into six separate 'War Stories’, each of which follows a new character and explores a different element of WWI combat, from trench warfare to tanks and early planes. The historical setting is handled tastefully, with an emphasis on the tragedy and horror of war, rather than its glorification, even featuring real-life statistics to back up the message.

The multiplayer is as vast as ever, with huge, detailed maps and expansive, lengthy battles. The older weapons encourage close-range shooting and melee combat, once again emphasising the visceral elements of war, while shifting tactics enough to keep even Battlefield vets on their toes.

The result is a game that knows when to take itself seriously and when to offer simple thrills, all presented in some of the best graphics 2016 has to offer.

Read more in our full Battlefield 1 review.

Watch Dogs 2

Watch Dogs 2
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  • RRP: £49.99

Watch Dogs 2 was a bit of a welcome surprise for some this year, offering substantial improvements on its predecessor while revamping its tone for something more unique, modern, and most importantly fun.

Gone is the first game’s moody, revenge-driven protagonist, replaced by a comparatively cheery young hacker named Marcus. He joins a hacking group to take down the high-tech surveillance system in San Francisco, though there are plenty of other missions along the way, including breaking into a Google-esque campus, becoming an Uber driver, and even leaking a new game trailer from publisher Ubisoft itself.

In terms of gameplay, Watch Dogs 2 takes the original’s hacking-based stealth further, with most encounters offering multiple paths forward. Plenty of objects in the environment are hackable, often in varied ways depending on your preferred tactics, allowing you to create distractions or take out guards. Sometimes making it all the way through with stealth alone isn’t quite enough though, and the game’s gunplay is a bit of a letdown.

The gunplay is also occasionally at odds with the lighter tone, though that remains one of the game's highlights, with plenty of hipster jokes and pop culture references - even the guns are 3D-printed.

Find out more about Watch Dogs 2 here.

Anarcute

Anarcute
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  • RRP: £11.99

It's all-out anarchy in the cutest little riot sim you ever did see: Anarcute.

You take control of a group of rioters rampaging through the city, causing all-out destruction in your wake. You can smash down lampposts, throw cars, and eventually even topple buildings, all in the name of overthrowing the cruel totalitarian police state oppressing the populace.

The twist is, every single one of your marauding rioters is a tiny adorable animal. You start out with bunny rabbits and kittens and eventually unlock the likes of the axolotl and even velociraptor as you travel round the world freeing cities including Tokyo, Paris, and Miami from their dictators. 

It's all irrepressibly adorable, but it's also amazingly good fun. The controls and mechanics are simple, but hide a lot of depth and a few genuinely challenging boss fights along the way. The main campaign runs for 5 or so hours, but there's a high score system and unlockables to add replayability, and at just £11.99 it's definitely worth it.

Forza Horizon 3

Forza Horizon 3
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  • RRP: £49.99

The latest game in the long-running Forza series is probably the biggest yet, taking basically the entirety of Australia as its setting. 

If you haven't played any of the Horizon games yet, they're a bit different from your standard racing fare. They're open-world racing games, meaning you have a giant environment to drive around in, within which you can find races, events, and challenges to take part in.

The Australian setting means there are seriously diverse environments, from outback desert to luscious rainforest, and vibrant cities to empty beaches. That same diversity extends to the cars, which cover just about every type of wheeled vehicle imaginable, letting you put a four-wheel-drive Land Rover against a Lamborghini in the same race.

Throw in stunning graphics and a huge amount of customisation, and the game is a pretty clear winner.

Forza Horizon 3 is also one of the first titles available through Xbox Games Anywhere, meaning that if you buy one copy of the game you can play it on both Windows 10 and the Xbox One at no additional cost. 

Dark Souls 3

Dark Souls 3
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  • RRP: £49.99

The Dark Souls games are notoriously difficult, and the third (and final?) entry doesn't disappoint.

Dark Souls III brings back the methodical combat and slow-drip worldbuilding of the first two games, once again challenging you with building a character and working through an array of monsters, ranging from undead soldiers up to more building-sized foes.

Of course, it wouldn't be a Souls game if those enemies didn't kill you again, and again, and again, and before long you'll learn to fear even the puniest of foes - nothing will kill you quicker than over-confidence. The key instead is learning the game's meticulous rhythms, perfecting the timing of every attack along the way. Dark Souls III is cruel, but never unfair, and there's an almost zen-like process of repetition and improvement for those who commit to the game.

Also see: Latest games how-to guides.

Rocket League

Rocket League
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  • RRP: £15.99

Rocket League sounds simple enough: you control a rocket-powered car in an enormous football pitch, and have to use any means necessary to get the giant ball into the opposing team’s goal. The cars can double jump into the air, and there’s a steep learning curve before you get the hang of actually hitting the ball, let alone sending it in the right direction. But once you do, it’s immensely satisfying, and before long you’ll be getting deep into Rocket League tactics.

Matches range from 1v1 up to 4v4, and last five minutes each, with the potential for overtime. That means matches are long enough to feel substantial and dramatic, but short enough to guarantee that 'just one more game' feeling every single time.

The cars all feature plenty of visual customisation options, so you can firmly place your own stamp on the game when you head into the online play, which gets surprisingly competitive. There are also item unlocks at the end of matches, and the more points you score the faster you level up your online ranking.

Read more in our full Rocket League review.

DOOM

DOOM
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  • RRP: £30

The original 1993 Doom is one of the most important and influential PC games of all time, so it only feels right to play the 2016 reboot on Windows rather than one of those newfangled home videogame consoles. 

That's because this is a refreshingly simple return to form. There are hell demons on Mars, and it's your job to kill them all. That's about everything you need to know - beyond that it's just point and shoot.

Combat is relentless and fast-paced, shifting away from the cover-based combat more popular in modern games. That doesn't mean you don't have to be tactical, of course - you just have to think fast as you plan your approach to clearing a room. 

That's helped by the creative vertical area design, which almost blends platforming with gunplay, and a few mechanics that encourage you to constantly push forward towards the next enemy. It's not one for the faint of heart, but it's a hell of a lot of fun.

Read more in our full DOOM review.

Titanfall 2

Titanfall 2
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  • RRP: £49.99

The first Titanfall was mutiplayer-only, but used that focus to craft one of the best competitive first-person shooters in years. Now all that hard work has been put to good use in Titanfall 2, which boasts not only tweaked multiplayer but also one of the finest singleplayer campaigns this year.

The six-hour campaign sees you fight your way through an alien planet backed by your friendly Titan - a huge, sentient battle robot. The Titan can operate independently as a form of high-powered backup, or you can climb inside to take direct control, stomping about and firing cannons, rockets, railguns, and more.

What sets the Titanfall 2 campaign apart isn't just the Titans though, or even the wall-running and double-jumping that turns the whole environment into a playground. Instead it's the sheer inventiveness of the level design, which frequently offers up new mechanics or challenges, from electrified walls to time travel, exploring each for a while before moving onto the next before any individual element can ever get stale.

Heading online, the multiplayer will be familiar to anyone who played Titanfall, but has been tweaked enough to make it feel new again too. Titans are less durable, but a new system has players stealing batteries from enemy Titans to bolster their own team's bots, demanding more teamwork than ever before.

Superhot

Superhot
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  • RRP: £19.99

The FPS genre is more popular than ever before, and despite novel entries like Titanfall 2 and Overwatch, it can sometimes feel a little stale. That's where Superhot comes in.

The indie hit takes the FPS format and turns it on its head, twisting the gunplay into something more akin to a puzzler. The twist is that time only moves when you do, so as long as you stand still you can evaluate the room and plan your next move.

It breaks combat down into a series of micro-encounters with welcome breaks in between, though you'll need to plan more than one move ahead at any given time to survive. Things are kept exciting by the variety of ways to take your opponents out, from standard guns to a variety of improvised melee weapons, and the ability to disarm enemies and use their own weapons to take them out.

The campaign features a surprisingly sinister plot exploring the seemingly virtual world illustrated by the stripped back visuals, and there's an extensive array of challenge modes to keep you busy when you're done.

XCOM 2

XCOM 2
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  • RRP: £49.99

It's no easy task to follow up a game as acclaimed as 2012's XCOM: Enemy Unknown, so it's pretty astonishing that XCOM 2 is somehow an improvement in just about every respect.

Once again, you control a small squad of commandos fighting off alien invaders in turn-based strategic combat. Between missions, you have to manage your base and resources, pick your next encounter, and do your best to contain the alien threat. 

The big story difference this time is that the aliens have already won, so you're now tasked not with preventing the invasion but instead rebelling against earth's new alien overlords. That story shift inspires a major new gameplay mechanic too: you now begin many missions in stealth, allowing you to carefully move forward and set up the perfect ambush for your extraterrestrial foes.

Maps are now procedurally generated, allowing much more variation than the last game could offer, while the leveling up and psionic systems have also been revamped and improved. If you loved Enemy Unknown, XCOM 2 is a polished refinement, and if you missed out on that game then XCOM 2 is a brilliant introduction to the series.

Inside

Inside
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  • RRP: £15.99

Limbo came out of nowhere to become one of the most highly acclaimed puzzle-platformers ever, and developer Playdead's follow-up Inside is somehow even better.

It starts out much as that game did, with a young boy alone in a dark forest. But from there Inside carves its own path, slowly unfolding a world of sinister factories, brainwashed workers, and mysterious genetic experiments, and doing it all without a single word of dialogue.

Along the way you have to navigate a series of 2D puzzles, finding ways to reach new areas, remove barriers, and escape enemies. The puzzles are smart, and are just challenging enough to prove satisfying without ever leaving you feeling truly stuck. 

The game's graphics are beautiful, their stark, minimalist style boasting a surprising amount of depth and some stunning lighting effects. Inside remains one of the most unique and memorable gaming experiences of 2016, building to a finale that will prove impossible to forget.