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More Security Articles

  • Opinion: Steam Gets Hacked: Here's How To Keep Safe

    If you're a gamer who plays titles that use the Steam platform from Valve, you may want to keep a close eye on your personal data.

  • News: Facebook may be close to privacy deal with FTC

    Facebook is close to reaching a deal with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that the social network engaged in "deceptive behavior" when changing its privacy settings, according to a report.

  • Opinion: For Android, Paid Mobile Security Is Better: Study

    As with your computer, the best defense against malware is a good offense in the form of security software. Paid mobile security apps are much better at detecting malware in Android devices than free antivirus applications, according to a study by AV Test today. If your business relies at all on smartphones, make sure that you and your employees are protected with the right mobile security package.

  • News: Should social networks be blocked at work?

    One of the biggest trends in IT is how consumer products have crept into the enterprise, and the trend extends to Internet services. The ingenious thing about social networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn is that these consumer-oriented sites have become key tools for professionals. Take journalists, for example. While reporters may still pound the pavement or work the phones to find stories, now sometimes a story can present itself in LinkedIn forums or through Facebook postings. Sometimes the social networks become an extension of the reporting team, in a practice called "crowdsourcing." And the reporter who used to appear as nothing more than a byline can now enter the conversation with instant feedback on a comment about a story. But other professions have not embraced social networks so much, and indeed have viewed them as threats to security or productivity. Would users spend their days catching up with high school friends and playing Farmville on Facebook? Remember when many IT departments were leery about users checking their personal email accounts from work, afraid they would click on a link and take down the entire network? While that danger still exists, it has been reduced a bit through the use of spam filters and user education. The same can be said for social networks, as IT staff can still provide general tips on what can be dangerous. In this PDF, Network World has compiled stories that take a look at the pros and cons of blocking social networks while at work. Many of these stories cite surveys that indicate whether productivity is lost in allowing social networks within the company network. Become an Insider today (free registration required) to download the PDF.

  • News: Forrester to security pros: Think before rushing to fix security holes

    Forrester Research this week published a report that advises security professionals not to jump the gun on fixing security deficiencies immediately after a data breach is identified since that could destroy valuable evidence needed to prosecute cyber-criminals.

  • News: Facebook: No comment on privacy settlement with the FTC

    Facebook on Thursday declined to comment on a news report that it is nearing a settlement with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission over concerns about changes in its privacy policy.

  • News: Gartner: Security services spending to hit $49B in 2015

    Gartner is predicting that corporate spending across the world for a broad swath of security services will climb from about $35 billion today to $49 billion in three years, with the managed security services expected to jump most of all.

  • Opinion: Mobile Users Want Privacy, Do Little to Protect It

    While large numbers of consumers are angry about security measures taken by custodians of their online data, three out of every four of them don't even take minimal measures to protect themselves from incursions on their privacy.

  • News: EU data protection reform will put pressure on foreign companies

    The European Commission is preparing a major reform of the E.U. Data Protection Directive, which will focus on how foreign companies handle European consumer data.

  • Opinion: Remove Hard-to-Kill Malware

    Jane13434 asked the Antivirus & Security Software forum about removing a malicious program that has defeated AVG, SUPERAntiSpyware, and Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware.

  • News: Understand mobile security in seven stories or less (a survival guide)

    A collection of articles to help you understand the mobile threat and plan your security program accordingly.

  • News: Firewalls fail to stem tide of DDoS attacks, survey finds

    Companies still rely heavily on firewalls to defend themselves against denial-of-service attacks despite the fact that this class of device is often not up to the task, a new survey by F5 Networks has found.

  • News: 7 Charged with Using Malware to Rack Up $14M in Fake Ad Revenue

    The Department of Justice has indicted seven people for allegedly hijacking millions of computers, manipulating traffic on popular websites, and generating more than $14 million in fraudulent advertising revenue.

  • News: Open-source toolkit tracks down Duqu infections

    The lab credited with discovering the Duqu malware has built an open-source toolkit that administrators can use to see whether their networks are infected.

  • How-Tos: How to protect a smartphone against malware

    Smartphone malware has surged by 800% in last four months. PC Advisor explains how you can secure you mobile phone against future attacks.

  • News: Feds lead biggest botnet takedown ever, end massive clickjack fraud

    The botnet takedown announced Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Justice was the biggest in history, according to a security company.

  • News: PC Advisor's top five tweets of the week – 9th November 2011

    It's been a busy few days in tech, with Adobe reportedly stopping development of flash on mobile devices and Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 being released.

  • News: BCS starts pilot for GCHQ-backed data security qualification

    BCS has launched a pilot programme to certify information assurance professionals on the back of a contract with the UK's GCHQ spying centre.

  • News: Most fraud is an inside job, says survey

    Fraud cost organizations 2.1 percent of earnings in the past 12 months, which is equivalent to a week of revenues over the course of a year, according to the Kroll Annual Global Fraud Report, a recent survey that polled more than 1,200 senior executives worldwide.

  • News: Apple Shoots the Messenger

    Charlie Miller, the perennial winner of the annual Pwn2Own contest for hacking and compromising Apple software, found a serious security flaw in Apple's App Store. Apple's response was to kick Miller out of the Apple Developer program. Shooting the messenger doesn't improve security or make the issue go away, so did Apple do the right thing?



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