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More Security Articles

  • Opinion: Windows Phone 7.5 SMS Vulnerability Can Disable Messaging

    Windows Phone 7 devices are susceptible to an SMS vulnerability that could lock users out of their messaging functions. The discovery comes from a tipster at the WinRumors blog, who demonstrated that a malicious SMS sent to Windows Phone 7.5 phones would force it to reboot and lock down the messaging hub.

  • News: Hospital turns away patients after "virus" disrupts network

    A US hospital had to turn away patients last week after being hit by a “virus” infection that downed the institution’s network and sent staff back to using paper records.

  • News: 'Duqu' zero-day Windows flaw patched this week

    Microsoft will tomorrow patch the zero-day kernel Word vulnerability exploited by the mysterious Duqu malware, more than a month after its existence was first made public.

  • News: Windows Phone bug reportedly disables messaging

    A reported vulnerability in Windows Phone causes its messaging features to be disabled after the device is sent a specific SMS or chat message.

  • News: Industrial espionage gang sends malicious emails in security vendor's name

    A cybercrime gang that primarily targets companies from the chemical industry has launched a new series of attacks that involve malware-laden emails purporting to be from Symantec, the security vendor responsible for exposing its operation earlier this year.

  • News: FBI rejects FOIA request for Carrier IQ info

    The FBI has denied a request for the release of information regarding its use of Carrier IQ's software, saying that releasing suchinformation could interfere with ongoing law enforcement operations.

  • News: ISACA: Users will soon not be able to opt out of location data sharing

    The value of location-based data to businesses is so great that soon users will not be able to opt out, an IT security expert has warned.

  • News: Telstra data breach under investigation by Privacy Commissioner

    The Privacy Commissioner, Timothy Pilgrim, has launched an investigation into Telstra's data breach which occurred on Friday when its customer service website was openly accessible on the Web.

  • News: School shuns popular Apple Mac for Windows

    For a self-described "Mac person" working as a technology manager in a college preparatory school that had been a "Mac school" for as long as he could remember, it was a hard thing to have to face but he said it out loud: "Apple never took enterprise computing seriously," says a somewhat disillusioned Adam Gerson, co-director of technology at Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School in New York City.

  • Opinion: Android Market Apps Pulled Due to SMS Fraud

    Google has pulled another batch of malicious apps from the Android Market, this time for secretly sending out text messages that result in hidden charges for users.

  • News: Google pulls 22 more malicious Android apps from Market

    Google has removed nearly two dozen malware-infected apps from its official Android Market in the last several days, according to San Francisco-based Lookout Security.

  • News: The new age of malware

    Smart devices, social media and increased online activity through app stores and other transaction-based websites are coming together in what one researcher says is a scary combination of factors that have dire implications for national security.

  • News: 5 IT Security Breakthroughs Promise to Thwart Threats

    For the past 25 years, a war has waged between malicious programmers and the researchers trying to make computing safe for the enterprise. The battle has shown no signs of subsiding — once a new countermeasure is deployed, the hackers find new ways to make IT worried.

  • News: The security threat Stephen King warned us about?

    Remember the film "Maximum Overdrive," where machines took over and went on a murderous rampage? With cars and appliances ever more computerized, such a security threat seems a little less farfetched as we head into 2012.

  • Opinion: Google+ Facial Recognition Uses Magic Words--'Opt-In'

    Google introduced a facial recognition feature for its Google+ social network. So far, it has been fairly well received--in stark contrast to a similar feature Facebook launched a few months ago. The main difference between the two? Google asked permission.

  • Opinion: Free Downloads That Are Worth a Donation, Part 2

    People often think of software as either commercial (including shareware), or free (including open-source offerings). But somewhere in between lies another large category of software: donationware. The creators of such programs give the software away for free, in the hope that appreciative users will donate to support the application or a cause the developer wishes to promote. In this article I cover lesser-known gems. For more-renowned donationware, read "Free Downloads That Are Worth a Donation, Part 1."

  • News: Three Bulgarians arrested in connection with phishing scheme against US banks

    Bulgarian authorities have arrested three men on charges of being part of an international cybercriminal gang that targeted U.S. bank customers.

  • News: FTC mails out refund checks for buyers of scareware

    The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has begun to mail refund checks to computer owners who purchased so-called scareware from vendors who allegedly used deceptive advertising to trick customers into buying the software to fix their supposedly infected computers.

  • News: Clickjacking attacks possible despite framebusting protection

    The so-called framebusting mechanism implemented in browsers to help websites prevent clickjacking attacks doesn't live up to expectations, according to Google security engineer and Web security researcher Michal Zalewski, who released [proof-of-concept code to demonstrate it.

  • News: 75% of Brits would retrieve a stolen laptop themselves

    Three quarters (75 percent) of Brits would try and retrieve a stolen laptop themselves if they knew its location, says Absolute Software.



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