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More Security Articles

  • News: Stratfor relaunches site; CEO accuses attackers of censorship

    Strafor Global Intelligence CEO George Friedman on Wednesday blasted those responsible for a December attack on the global intelligence firm's website and decried what he called 'censorship' by the attackers.

  • News: Symantec employs scareware sales tactics, lawsuit charges

    A Washington man on Tuesday sued Symantec in federal court, accusing it of using the same tactics as fake "scareware" software to sell its PC cleanup utilities.

  • News: Samsung Galaxy Devices Get Important Security Clearance

    Samsung has just received Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) approval for the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 Wi-Fi, the 4G LTE-enabled Galaxy Tab 10.1 with Verizon, and the global version of the Galaxy S II smartphone.

  • News: Can you trust data-recovery service providers?

    Data-recovery service providers are supposed to be saving important data for you when something goes wrong -- a drive crashes or storage device is dropped, and no backup is available. But do you trust them with the important data you let them recover or could they actually be a source for a data breach?

  • News: Cybersecurity help exists, focusing it is the trick

    There are a ton of groups out there that offer cybersecurty help and guidance, the trick, it seems is finding he right one for you organization.

  • News: Lawsuit claims Symantec sells scareware-like products

    Symantec has been accused in a lawsuit of California's unfair competition laws and fraudulent inducement by using scareware-like tactics to trick users into buying licenses for its PC utility-type products.

  • News: Public attack code aimed at Windows Web servers works, says Symantec

    Researchers at Symantec yesterday confirmed that working attack code published Jan. 6 can cripple Web servers running Microsoft's ASP .Net.

  • News: Carrier IQ detection tool converted to premium SMS Trojan

    Android malware writers are taking advantage of the controversy surrounding Carrier IQ's smartphone tracking software in order to distribute a premium SMS Trojan, security researchers from Symantec warn.

  • News: German police GPS hacked after Trojan backfires

    Last July’s shutdown of a GPS vehicle tracking system used by German police to monitor suspects has apparently been traced back to an officer’s incompetent attempt to monitor his daughter’s Internet use with a spy Trojan.

  • News: Israeli credit-card hack draws a response

    More than 400 credit card numbers claimed to belong to Saudi Arabian citizens were released on Tuesday in apparent retaliation for the release of 15,000 active credit card numbers of Israelis last week.

  • News: Israeli credit-card hack draws a response

    More than 400 credit card numbers claimed to belong to Saudi Arabian citizens were released on Tuesday in apparent retaliation for the release of 15,000 active credit card numbers of Israelis last week.

  • News: Adobe plugs 6 critical holes in Reader

    Adobe on Tuesday patched six vulnerabilities in the newest version of its popular Reader PDF viewer, making good on a late-2011 promise when it shipped an emergency update for an older edition.

  • News: What does 2012 have in store for Anonymous?

    Anonymous had a busy year in 2011 pushing its hacker-activist agenda on companies around the Web, to the point where just the sound of the hacker group's name can send shivers down the spine of many a CIO. Anonymous in 2011 took on everything from HB Gary to a Mexican cartel, from oil companies to banks, from NBC to a transportation site. The group has positioned itself as a kind of Internet-based Robin Hood; when it hacked banks, the group claimed it was helping “the 99%” by giving money from the banks back to the people who rightfully deserved it. What have companies learned from this year of terror? The most that can be said is that corporate security needs to be shored up. At a conference panel in August it was evident that instead of battening down the security hatches, some companies were looking to just lessen the economic impact of a hack on their site. Network World has assembled some of the key stories surrounding Anonymous, the reactions from enterprise IT and their advice for surviving an attack, in a special PDF report that is free with Insider registration. So take a peek and then register to receive this package of stories about hackers' doings last year and what can be done next. Download “Hacktivists vs. the World” today. [[link]]

  • Opinion: Microsoft Slays the BEAST, and Six Other Patch Tuesday Updates

    Happy New Year! We are already at the second Tuesday of 2012, and that means it's time for the first Patch Tuesday of the year. Microsoft has released a total of seven security bulletins -- one ranked as "critical", with the remaining 6 designated merely as "important".

  • News: Media Player, security bypass are focus of Microsoft's first Patch Tuesday of 2012

    Seven bulletins, one deemed critical, and a handful of new Microsoft security issues all arrived today as part of Microsoft's first Patch Tuesday of 2012.

  • News: Microsoft patches critical Windows drive-by bug

    Microsoft today shipped seven security updates that patched eight vulnerabilities in Windows and a code library used to protect Web applications from cross-site scripting attacks.

  • News: Avira Teams with secure.me for Facebook Security

    Privacy and security concerns come with the territory when you use a social network like Facebook. Avira is partnering with secure.me to deliver protection that extends beyond traditional malware, and helps defend your personal information and reputation as well.

  • News: Cloud and disaster recovery: Load-balanced data centers are not a perfect solution

    A growing trend in the disaster recovery arena for cloud providers is the use of load-balanced data centers instead of hot-cold data centers. Companies are deploying private clouds that are load balanced between their datacenters to take care of disaster needs. If one datacenter suffered from a disaster, the other datacenter would be operating even though it is at reduced capacity.

  • News: Attack code published for serious ASP.NET DoS vulnerability

    Exploit code for a recently patched denial-of-service (DoS) vulnerability that affects Microsoft's ASP.NET Web development platform has been published online, therefore increasing the risk of potential attacks.

  • News: Virtual-security appliances winning users over traditional messaging-security software

    There's no question enterprises want messaging security -- the market for products and services worldwide reached almost $3.2 billion last year, up from $2.7 billion in 2010, and will grow to $4.78 billion in 2015, according to research firm IDC. But a fundamental shift is occurring that foresees businesses favoring virtual-security appliances over more traditional messaging security software.



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