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More Security Articles

  • News: IBM targets managed security service at iOS, Android, Windows, BlackBerry smartphones

    IBM is offering a cloud-based managed service for mobile devices that will let IT managers exert management and security controls over devices based on Apple iOS, Google Android, the RIM BlackBerry, Symbian and Microsoft Windows Mobile.

  • Opinion: Spam Researchers Help Bust Global Cybercrime Ring

    When law enforcement authorities took down this week an international ring of Internet grifters who allegedly scammed more than $14 million from their victims, a key element of their crackdown was a spam database maintained by the University of Alabama-Birmingham.

  • News: Researchers bypass the restrictions of Mac OS X default sandbox profiles

    The restrictions imposed by Mac OS X generic application sandbox profiles can be easily bypassed, researchers from Core Security Technologies found.

  • News: Energy giant EDF used Trojans to spy on Greenpeace

    The head of nuclear security at French energy giant EDF has been given a prison sentence and his company fined a stinging 1.5 million euros (£1.3 million) after being found guilty of spying on environmental campaigners Greenpeace using Trojan malware.

  • News: Fast Five: This week in IT 11/11/11

    Your five-minute wrap of the top Australian ICT stories this week.

  • News: Hackers may have spent years crafting Duqu

    The hacker group behind Duqu may have been working on its attack code for more than four years, new analysis of the Trojan revealed Friday.

  • News: Security roundup for week ending Nov. 11

    Is there justice in cyberspace? The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) last week offered hope there is, charging seven individuals with 27 counts of wire fraud and other computer-related crimes in connection with a massive "clickfraud" scheme that was based in Estonia.

  • Opinion: Privacy: Will Facebook Ever Get It?

    With Facebook reportedly close to cutting a deal with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over privacy sins dating back to 2009, the question remains whether or not the social network's brain trust really gets the privacy issue.

  • News: Who's hacking your refrigerator?

    Now that everything's networked and process control systems are easy to hack, here's a quick-reference guide to figuring out who's behind each type of security incident.

  • News: CI pinpoints 200 millionth piece of cloud-based malware

    The good news is that Collective Intelligence (CI), the engine for Internet security created in 2006 by Panda Security's malware research laboratory, recently processed its 200 millionth malware file via the cloud. That's also the bad news.

  • News: Duqu authors sprinkle humor in dangerous code

    For all of the concern around Duqu, the most discussed piece of malicious software since Stuxnet, the latest analysis of its code shows its writers have a sense of humor.

  • News: Apple issues MacBook Pro, AirPort firmware updates

    Hope you're in a firmware-updating mood, because Apple's released updates for both the MacBook Pro as well as the AirPort Base Station and Time Capsule.

  • News: Germany prepares to sue Facebook over facial recognition feature

    The Hamburg Data Protection Authority (DPA) is starting preliminary procedures to bring legal action against Facebook over the facial recognition feature used for photo tagging on the social network. The authority decided that further negotiation is futile after the social networking giant didn't agree to obtain consent from users retroactively.

  • News: FBI disrupts search hijack gang after $14 million fraud

    The FBI has closed the net on an Estonian gang accused of being behind an extraordinary four-year multinational malware campaign said to have netted $14 million (£8.8 million) in proceeds after infecting hundreds of thousands of PCs and Macs.

  • News: Cycling star Landis sentenced for alleged Trojan attack

    Former US cycling star Floyd Landis has been handed a suspended 12-month prison sentence by a French court for his part in an alleged plot to steal documents from the country’s national anti-doping laboratory (LNDD) using Trojan malware.

  • How-Tos: How To Lock Down Your Wireless Network

    If you operate a wireless network for your home or business, it's important to ward it against opportunistic hackers seeking to steal your data or hijack your Wi-Fi for their own nefarious purposes. We spoke to Steven Andrés, CTO of security consulting firm Special Ops Security, to learn about the best ways to lock down your Wi-Fi. To get started, you'll need to log in to your router's administrative console by typing the router's IP address into your Web browser's address bar. Most routers use a common address like 192.168.1.1, though alternatives like 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.2.1 are also common. Check the manual that came with your router to determine the correct IP address; if you've lost your manual, you can usually find the appropriate IP address on the manufacturer's website.

  • Opinion: Steam Gets Hacked: Here's How To Keep Safe

    If you're a gamer who plays titles that use the Steam platform from Valve, you may want to keep a close eye on your personal data.

  • News: Facebook may be close to privacy deal with FTC

    Facebook is close to reaching a deal with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that the social network engaged in "deceptive behavior" when changing its privacy settings, according to a report.

  • Opinion: For Android, Paid Mobile Security Is Better: Study

    As with your computer, the best defense against malware is a good offense in the form of security software. Paid mobile security apps are much better at detecting malware in Android devices than free antivirus applications, according to a study by AV Test today. If your business relies at all on smartphones, make sure that you and your employees are protected with the right mobile security package.

  • News: Should social networks be blocked at work?

    One of the biggest trends in IT is how consumer products have crept into the enterprise, and the trend extends to Internet services. The ingenious thing about social networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn is that these consumer-oriented sites have become key tools for professionals. Take journalists, for example. While reporters may still pound the pavement or work the phones to find stories, now sometimes a story can present itself in LinkedIn forums or through Facebook postings. Sometimes the social networks become an extension of the reporting team, in a practice called "crowdsourcing." And the reporter who used to appear as nothing more than a byline can now enter the conversation with instant feedback on a comment about a story. But other professions have not embraced social networks so much, and indeed have viewed them as threats to security or productivity. Would users spend their days catching up with high school friends and playing Farmville on Facebook? Remember when many IT departments were leery about users checking their personal email accounts from work, afraid they would click on a link and take down the entire network? While that danger still exists, it has been reduced a bit through the use of spam filters and user education. The same can be said for social networks, as IT staff can still provide general tips on what can be dangerous. In this PDF, Network World has compiled stories that take a look at the pros and cons of blocking social networks while at work. Many of these stories cite surveys that indicate whether productivity is lost in allowing social networks within the company network. Become an Insider today (free registration required) to download the PDF.



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