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  • News: Apple's Popular Apps Not Exclusive to iPhone: Analysis

    Apple has the largest app store by a long shot: Currently iPhone users can choose from 350,000 apps. But how many apps do people really use--and should the size of the Apple App Store sway your next smartphone purchase? It shouldn't.

  • News: Time Inc gives free iPad subscriptions to print subscribers

    Reports in the Wall Street Journal and CNet seem to confirm that Time Inc.—the parent company of Time, Sports Illustrated, and Fortune—has reached a deal with Apple to make the iPad editions of its magazines free to its print subscribers. As the Journal notes, this change may “signal a possible resolution between Apple and publishers.”

  • Opinion: Apture Highlights for Firefox Finds Extra Information

    Looking to dig deeper for information about any word or phrase you find on a Web site? Then you'll want to get the free Firefox add-on Apture Highlights, which gives you a remarkable amount of useful and entertaining information with a few quick clicks. If you're familiar with the Apture Highlights for Chrome extension, this one for Firefox will be familiar to you: It looks and works the same.

  • News: Time Inc Gives Free iPad Access to Print Subscribers

    Time Inc has secured a deal with Apple that will bundle free iPad access to print subscribers, according to a Wall Street Journal report. If you have a print subscription to Time, Sports Illustrated, or Fortune, you will be able to log into the iPad versions of the publications and get the electronic editions for free starting today.

  • News: Apple's iCloud Service Spotted as 'Castle'

    References to what may be a code name for Apple's rumored iCloud service are reported found in the latest developer preview of Mac OS X Lion by the French blog Consomac.

  • News: Congress Wants Answers from Sony

    Members of Congress' Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade want some answers from Sony regarding the recent PSN security breach.

  • Opinion: Is Sonys PSN Welcome Back Enough?

    Sony Japan’s explanation for the PSN’s takedown yesterday didn’t tell us much, but--nearly a week and a half on--at least the company apologized. Sony’s deputy president Kazuo Hirai took the stage, bent forward as if to touch his toes in a deep and held bow, then apologized “for the great anxiety and inconvenience” caused by the ongoing PSN and Qriocity outages.

  • News: Osama Bin Laden's Hideout Gets Google Maps Treatment

    Google Maps fans have been in full satire mode writing reviews for what might be the site where American forces killed Osama Bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Shortly after President Obama spoke to the nation on Sunday, people scoured Google's satellite imagery and came up with what may very well be the hideout where the al-Qaeda leader was staying. The purported Bin Laden site on Google Maps looks like a large estate surrounded by large security walls, similar to the description of the compound showing up in news reports.

  • Video: Sony apologises for PlayStation Network attack, outage

    Sony executives apologise for the potential loss of personal information

  • News: Sony finds no apparent Anonymous link to PlayStation attack

    Sony said it has found no link between an attack on its PlayStation Network and Qriocity services and Internet activist group Anonymous, which had earlier targeted its systems.

  • News: Internal emails show Google tracks your location

    A series of internal e-mails from last year highlights how important location data is to Google, and likely gives more ammunition to privacy advocates over how these companies track your every move.

  • News: iPhoto update adds new card themes, fixes bugs

    On Tuesday, Apple released the latest update to iPhoto 9—aka iPhoto ’11. iPhoto 9.1.2 adds new card themes to the app, as well as provides the obligatory improvements in “overall stability” and addresses a number of other minor issues.

  • Opinion: Why you shouldn't care about location tracking

    I sat down at my computer, prepared to sync my iPhone 4 with iTunes. But I looked at the simple white cord I use to connect the phone, and it suddenly seemed more ominous -- like it was some sort of spy transmitter, sending the private details of my life directly to Apple.

  • News: Osama bin Laden's death key topic on internet

    People go online to get information and discuss Osama bin Laden's death

  • Feature: The week in Apple iPhone 5 rumours

    Here's the weekly roundup of iPhone 5 rumors from around the Web, and they range from the latest on everything from more white models to wireless charging to the coming of iOS 5.

  • News: IE9 can't stop Microsoft's browser slump

    The March launches of Internet Explorer 9 (IE9) and Firefox 4 failed to stop Microsoft's and Mozilla's decline in browser share, new Web usage data shows.

  • Feature: 10 tips to turn Android into a business phone

    Android has shot past BlackBerry to become the third most popular smartphone operating system in the world behind Symbian and the iPhone, according to StatCounter.

  • News: The week in iPhone 5 rumors

    Here's the weekly roundup of iPhone 5 rumors from around the Web, and they range from the latest on everything from more white models to wireless charging to the coming of iOS 5.

  • News: Privacy Lost: The Amazing Benefits of the Completely Examined Life

    Your iPhone's tracking you. Your game network just surrendered all your personal data. And your mom is posting your potty-training videos on Facebook. Like many of us, you're laboring under the delusion that privacy matters--that there's such a thing as too much (public) information. It's time to get over it! Soon we'll all recognize the positives of exposing every aspect of our lives. What a relief it will be when we've finally revealed everything and have nothing left to hide. Herewith, the potential benefits of our upcoming, privacy-free utopia:

  • Opinion: Stop the Cloud, I Want to Get Off!

    Remember when the "cloud" was just called the "Internet?" This absurd fascination with naming online services after suspended atmospheric condensation is kind of driving me nuts. For around 14 years, millions of people have used Hotmail, but they didn't use a "cloud email solution." When we were all ripping our CDs a decade ago and looking up track information on the CDDB, we weren't using a "cloud music information service." Look, it's just the Internet, people. We don't need a new word to say that data is stored on a central server. I can't wait for the day when "cloud" joins the dustbin of overused and meaningless technology marketing words, along with push, virtual reality, and multimedia.



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Live Blog: Apple financial results, record June quarter, 35.2m iPhones sold, $37.4b revenue

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Welcome to the upgrade cycle - you'll never leave

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